Working Women within MENA Countries Term Paper by Nicky

Working Women within MENA Countries
A look at the labor conditions of women in the Middle East and Northern part of Africa (MENA).
# 148689 | 1,323 words | 3 sources | APA | 2011 | US


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Description:

This paper presents an in-depth analysis of women in the Middle East and Northern part of Africa (MENA) and their participation, or lack there of, in these nations' labor forces. Various factors are listed which describe why women in these traditionally male-dominated cultures do not seek employment outside of the home. The paper parallels the work situation of MENA women who do seek employment outside of the home vis a vis Western women. It also addresses hiring practices and cultural factors which may inhibit MENA women from seeking work. The paper concludes by suggesting ways that MENA women could improve their work and economic situation.

Outline:

Introduction
Facts about Working Women in MENA
The Public Sector
Hiring Policies
Factors in Female Participation to Labor Force
Cultural Factors
Educational Factors
Economic Factors
Suggestions for Improvements

From the Paper:

"Considering that the cultural and educational barriers are beginning to be removed, the question remains as to why the gender structure in the MENA countries continues to be off-balanced? The most eloquent answer is given by the economic barriers which affect the overall labor force in the Middle East and North African states, but most probably the women as they are yet an unformed market and extremely sensitive to modifications. First of all, there are several financial institutions that refuse (or are required to refuse by law) to grant loans to women. Since they do not have this possibility, some women choose to not work. Then, employment opportunities are generally low in the MENA regions, not just for women, but for the entire labor force market. Third, despite the investments in the public sector, the state is yet unable to offer adequate childcare conditions, which continue to force women to stay at home and care for their offspring."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Akeel, M., 2005, Women's Employment Initiative, Saudi-US Relations, http://www.saudi-us-relations.org/newsletter2005/saudi-relations-interest-01-27.html last accessed on May 13, 2009
  • Gurria, A., November 2007, MENA-OECD Women Business Leaders Forum and Business Forum, OECD, http://www.oecd.org/document/53/0,3343,en_2649_34529562_39686389_1_1_1_1,00.html last accessed on May 13, 2009
  • 2008, Interesting Facts about Working Women in the MENA Region, Travel Pod, http://www.travelpod.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=10225 last accessed on May 13, 2009

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Working Women within MENA Countries (2011, October 29) Retrieved January 28, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/working-women-within-mena-countries-148689/

MLA Format

"Working Women within MENA Countries" 29 October 2011. Web. 28 January. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/working-women-within-mena-countries-148689/>

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