U.S. Foreign Policy Towards North Korea Term Paper by Nicky

U.S. Foreign Policy Towards North Korea
An examination of the United States' foreign policy towards North Korea.
# 149311 | 1,805 words | 7 sources | APA | 2011 | US


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Description:

The paper presents the thesis that the forceful stance taken by the Bush administration was the primary driver behind North Korea's desire for nuclear weapon and energy production. The paper addresses the United States' policies of engagement, containment and transformation, and discusses how North Korea underwent internal changes as well as changes due to external factors that placed it in a defensive stance in its focus on strategically avoiding threats and in rebuilding its own self-reliance economically.

Outline:
Objective
Statement of Thesis
Introduction
Security Dilemma or Rogue State?
Economic Reform in North Korea
Engagement, Containment and Transformation
Summary and Conclusion

From the Paper:

"North Korea underwent internal changes as well as changes due to external factors that placed North Korea in a defensive stance in its focus on strategically avoiding threats and in rebuilding its own self-reliance economically. For North Korea since the Berlin Wall fell the use of conventional weapons by North Korea in defending itself from external foes has not been a feasible proposition, therefore, it is apparent that North Korea acquired nuclear capabilities because of the value of these capabilities as use as a method for ensuring adequate self-defense in what the regime in North Korea views as a highly unstable security environment and one in which North Korea is quite terrified that will result in the United States becoming aggressive from a military standpoint.
"It really can not be held as true that the reason for the development of nuclear capability in North Korea was one that was driven simply on the bases of the country's elite and their own personal interests but instead has arisen as a problem because of the North Koreans lack of any real leverage politically, economically and in the way of resources. The present regime in North Korea has not real intention of engaging the country at the global political level as this regime has effectively isolated itself."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Lin, Liu (2006) The North Korean Nuclear Test and Its Implications. Central-Asia - Caucasus Institute Silk Road Studies Program. Online available at: http://www.silkroadstudies.org/new/docs/Silkroadpapers/2006/LiuLin%20Final061204.pdf.
  • Yongho, Kim and Yi, Yurim (2005) Security Dilemmas and Signaling During the North Korean Nuclear Standoff. Asian Perspective. Vol. 29, No.3, 2005, pp. 73-97. Online available at: http://www.asianperspective.org/articles/v29n3-d.pdf
  • Xizhen, Zhang and Brown, Eugene (2000) Policies Toward North Korea: A Time for New Thinking. Journal of Contemporary China. Vol. 9, Issue 25, November 2000. pp.535-545.
  • Sujian, Guo and Stradiotto, Gary A. (2007) The Nature and Direction of Economic Reform in North Korea. Political Studies, Vol.55, No. 4 December 2007. pp. 754-778(25) Blackwell Publishing.
  • Bleiker, Roland. 2003. "A Rogue is a Rogue is a Rogue: US Foreign Policy and the Korean Nuclear Crisis." International Affairs 79, 4: 719-737.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

U.S. Foreign Policy Towards North Korea (2011, December 05) Retrieved September 18, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/us-foreign-policy-towards-north-korea-149311/

MLA Format

"U.S. Foreign Policy Towards North Korea" 05 December 2011. Web. 18 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/us-foreign-policy-towards-north-korea-149311/>

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