Third World Women Term Paper by ABCs

Third World Women
A look at the roles of women in developing countries' social, political and economic development.
# 114155 | 985 words | 5 sources | APA | 2009 | US
Published on May 31, 2009 in Women Studies (Women and Society)


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Description:

The paper discusses the evidence that entrenched social, economic and political inequities in developing world countries still exist, while there are also achievements and advancements that have occurred in the position of women, as shown by the election of the female president of Liberia. The paper shows how female political advocacy has been impacted by long-standing cultural discrimination, and particularly by the impact of AIDS on African women. The paper therefore concludes by calling for more female education and economic empowerment.

Outline:
Introduction
India and Pakistan
New Female Leaders
AIDS in Africa
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"While the conventional construction in the Western media may suggest that Third World women are 'oppressed,' this belies the considerably more complex role they have played in liberating the region from colonial control and reconstructing damaged economic and political infrastructures in Africa and Latin and Central America. Grim statistics, such as the fact that 3/4 of all African women are HIV positive coexist with inspiring anecdotal examples, such as the recent election of the female president of Liberia, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, who is one of the most praised and vocal advocates for change in the region (Fleshman 2004, p4; Scott-Johnson 2008). The status of women in the developing world can best be described as schizophrenic. There is substantial evidence that entrenched social, economic and political inequities still exist, even though these facts should not eclipse the achievements and advancements that have occurred in the position of women, as they are evidence of the possibility and hope of change."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Fleshman, Michael. (2004). Women: The face of AIDS in Africa. Africa Recovery. 18(3),6. Retrieved from the Web 25 Aug 2008. http://www.un.org/ecosocdev/geninfo/afrec/vol18no3/183women_aids.htm
  • Lane, Kate. (1995). Gender bias: Perspectives from the developing world. Advocates for Youth. Retrieved from the Web 25 Aug 2008. http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/PUBLICATIONS/factsheet/fsgender.htm
  • Liberia and Chile elect female leaders. (16 Jan 2006) Spiegel International.Retrieved from the Web 25 Aug 2008. http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,395516,00.html
  • Ruether, Rosemary Radford. (1996). Rift between Gutierrez and Peru women: Liberation theology said to be too narrow. National Catholic Reporter. Retrieved from FindArticles.com 25 Aug. 2008. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1141/is_n44_v32/ai_18791250
  • Scott-Johnson, Sietta. (2008). Follow the leader: A film portrait of Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf. Published by the International Museum of Women. Retrieved from the Web on 24 Aug 2008. http://www.imow.org/wpp/stories/viewStory?storyId=924

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Third World Women (2009, May 31) Retrieved May 10, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/third-world-women-114155/

MLA Format

"Third World Women" 31 May 2009. Web. 10 May. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/third-world-women-114155/>

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