The Theories of Freud, Adler and Jung Term Paper by Beng

The Theories of Freud, Adler and Jung
A review of the theories of Freud, Adler, and Jung, the pillars of contemporary psychology.
# 148756 | 937 words | 3 sources | APA | 2007 | PH
Published on Nov 05, 2011 in Psychology (Freud) , Psychology (Jung) , Psychology (Theory)


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

The paper outlines Freud's basic beliefs on the conscious, the preconscious and the unconscious and on the id, ego and superego. The paper then discusses Jung's analytic or depth psychology that was built on Freud's ideas and introduced the idea of the collective unconscious. Finally, the paper looks at Adler's beliefs on inferiority and how they opposed those of Freud.

Outline:
Freud's Psychoanalytic theory
Jung's Analytic or Depth Psychology
Adler's Individual Psychology
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"As an heir apparent to Freud, Carl Jung's analytic or depth psychology is closely bound with the theories of the former. Classified as an "offshoot" of Freud's psychoanalysis theory, Jung explained that there is a dimension of the unconscious that Freud has failed to acknowledge--the collective unconscious. It is, according to Jung, "the deepest layer of the unconscious mind that is shared by all human beings" (Ticao, 2001, p.313). It goes back to the time of the ancient world, revealing common experiences, which are being made permanent in the mind. This contains what are called "archetypes" that sort out experiences, usually when the conscious mind is either distracted or inactive. Apart from what Freud stated that dreams are related to sexual and aggressive instincts of the id, Jung conversely pronounced that dreams are principally archetypes that are unconsciously expressed during sleep or when inactive. He also mentioned about the presence of the "animus" and the "anima". The animus refers to "the archetype that represents the masculine side of females" (Ticao, 2001, p.314), while the anima refers to the feminine side of males, from which this archetypes help males and females react with one another. Each human being, according to Jung, has a "shadow": a darker, evil side of the person that is expressed through literature and art. It was also him who first introduced the concepts of introversion and extroversion. In introversion, the interest is being directed to oneself; while in extroversion, the interest is being directed to the outer world (Ticao, 2001, p.314)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Shamdasani, S. (2003). Jung and the making of modern psychology: the dream of a science. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
  • Ticao, C.J. (2001). Introduction to Psychology (Volume II). Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines: UPOU Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services.
  • Ticao, C.J. (2001). Introduction to Psychology (Volume I). Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines: UPOU Office of Academic Support and Instructional Services.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

The Theories of Freud, Adler and Jung (2011, November 05) Retrieved April 21, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-theories-of-freud-adler-and-jung-148756/

MLA Format

"The Theories of Freud, Adler and Jung" 05 November 2011. Web. 21 April. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-theories-of-freud-adler-and-jung-148756/>

Comments