The Practice of Female Genital Mutilation in Islam Term Paper by Peter Pen

Looks at the way in which the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) is related to Muslim tradition.
# 145389 | 5,330 words | 14 sources | MLA | 2010


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Description:

This paper describes the practice, origin and history of female genital mutilation (FGM) especially as related to the Muslims of the Middle East. While the Qur'an does not support FGM, the author points out that the major correlations with these mutilation rates are Muslim customs, education levels , the mother's demographics and rural geographic regions. The paper stresses that FGM must be stopped because not only is it a human rights issue but also it is detrimental to the health of the victims and of future generations. The paper includes footnotes, an illustration and tables.

Table of Contents:
Abstract
Introduction
What Female Genital Mutilation Is
A Description of the Act of Female Genital Mutilation
The History of Female Genital Mutilation among Muslims in the Middle East
The Origin of Female Genital Mutilation in the Middle East
The Age Female Genital Mutilation is Performed on Muslim children
Statistics of Female Genital Mutilation among Middle Eastern Muslims
Why Female Genital Mutilation is Performed among Muslims
Reasons Why Muslims perform Female Genital Mutilation on Women
Female Genital Mutilation as a Violation of Human Rights
A Human Rights Issue
Health Risk Factors Linked to Female Genital Mutilation....
Summary and Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Scripture found within the Qur'an does not support female genital mutilation. Given this fact, we must look deeper, and determine where this reasoning lies, and whether this practice can be truly attributed to the religion of Islam itself. Islam, as a religion, when compared to other monotheistic religions, attributes guidance of a Muslim's life to more than the single holy book of its followers. Here is where Islam breaks away from the two other predominant monotheistic religions of Christianity, and Judaism. In contrast, Islam relies on many written and unwritten "hadiths"."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Berkey, Jonathan P. "The Formation of Islam: Religion and society in the Near East."Cambridge University Press (2003)
  • Bikoo, Maligaye. "Female genital mutilation: classification and management. (Cover story)." Nursing Standard 22, no. 7 (October 24, 2007): 43-49. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed July 5, 2009).
  • Birch, Nicholas. 2006. "Ancient Practice of Female Genital Mutilation Still a Threat to Iraqi Women." World & I 21, no. 1: 28-28. International Security & Counter Terrorism Reference Center, EBSCOhost (accessed July 7, 2009).
  • Cole, Juan. "Sacred space and holy war: The politics, culture and history of Shi'ite Islam." MPG Books Ltd (2002)
  • Collinet, P. et al. "Management of female genital mutilation in Djibouti: the Peltier General hospital experience." Acta Obstetricia & Gynecologica Scandinavica 81, no. 11 (November 2002): 1074-1077. Academic Search Premier, EBSCOhost (accessed July 5, 2009).

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

The Practice of Female Genital Mutilation in Islam (2010, November 07) Retrieved February 17, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-practice-of-female-genital-mutilation-in-islam-145389/

MLA Format

"The Practice of Female Genital Mutilation in Islam" 07 November 2010. Web. 17 February. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-practice-of-female-genital-mutilation-in-islam-145389/>

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