The Long Reaching Effects of the Emancipation Act Term Paper by scribbler

The Long Reaching Effects of the Emancipation Act
A discussion on the significant implications of the Emancipation Act of 1833.
# 153343 | 1,054 words | 2 sources | APA | 2013 | US
Published on May 23, 2013 in History (British) , African-American Studies (Slavery)


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Description:

The paper relates that the Emancipation Act of 1833, or the British West Indian Emancipation Act, created one of the broadest, most encompassing changes ever within the British Empire. The paper explains that the Act ended slavery in the British Empire in 1834 and was the culmination of decades of wrangling between abolitionists and West Indian lobbyists. The paper discusses how this parliamentary legislation had several major social and economic repercussions; the abolition of slavery necessitated a restructuring of the British economy, and it redefined British interests in the larger world.

Outline:
Introduction
Background
Discussion
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Slavery was officially abolished in most of the British Empire on August 1, 1834. In reality, however, only slaves below the age of six were free at this time as all slaves over the age of six were designated as apprentices. Apprentices continued to serve their former owners for a period of time after the abolition of slavery. They were divided into three classes and the length of time they served depended on which class they were a member.
"The first class of apprentices were former slaves who "in their State of Slavery were usually employed in Agriculture, or in the Manufacture of Colonial Produce or otherwise, upon Lands belonging to their Owners". The second class of apprentices were former slaves who "in their State of Slavery were usually employed in Agriculture, or in the Manufacture of Colonial Produce or otherwise, upon Lands not belonging to their Owners". The third class of apprentices was composed of all former slaves "not included within either of the two preceding classes". Apprentices within the third class were released from their apprenticeships on 1 August 1838. The remaining apprentices within the first and second classes were released from their apprenticeships on 1 August 1840."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Emancipation. (NDI). Black presence: Asian and black history in Britain 1500-1850. In National Archieves. Retrieved March 29, 2011 from http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/pathways/blackhistory/rights/emancipation.htm#top
  • Kaufman, W. & Macpherson, H. S. (2005). Britain and the Americas:Culture, politics, and history. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, Inc.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

The Long Reaching Effects of the Emancipation Act (2013, May 23) Retrieved November 19, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-long-reaching-effects-of-the-emancipation-act-153343/

MLA Format

"The Long Reaching Effects of the Emancipation Act" 23 May 2013. Web. 19 November. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-long-reaching-effects-of-the-emancipation-act-153343/>

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