The Hubris of Creon and Antigone Term Paper by Nicky

The Hubris of Creon and Antigone
A discussion on the stubbornness of Creon and Antigone in Sophocles' play, "Antigone".
# 148763 | 1,120 words | 2 sources | MLA | 2011 | US
Published on Nov 05, 2011 in Literature (Greek and Roman) , Drama and Theater (Greek and Roman)


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Description:

The paper discusses Creon in Sophocles' play, "Antigone" as an excellent example of how a character can be brought down by his own hubris because he is incredibly arrogant. The paper then discusses Antigone and how she is also stubborn and guilty of outrageous behavior, but her motivations are love and compassion and not self-pride. The paper points out that both instances result in tragedy, but Antigone experiences a death of honor, while Creon has a death of shame.

From the Paper:

"Creon is an excellent example of how a character can be brought down by his own hubris because he is incredibly arrogant. His arrogance causes him to make an erroneous decision regarding Antigone and her convictions. Because he is king, Creon is accustomed to demanding the respect that he believes he deserves from everyone, including members of his won family. This attitude of ingratiation goes to his head and it clouds his thinking in regards to what is right. It proves that while he might be king, he is still human and prone to mistakes just like everyone else. However, he is too concerned with his own place in the world and his own actions to think about Antigone and her feelings. He feels nothing but insult when she acts the way she does. Because he is obsessed with being king and not being insulted as king, he is compelled to do something about Antigone's actions. He is blinded to truth and justice and, as a result, cannot see the honor in her act. He tells Antigone, "No woman is going to lord it over me" (Sophocles 593). Here we see that Creon is concerned about nothing but himself and his place in the kingdom. Another reason why we know that Creon suffers because of his hubris is because he admits it at the end of the play."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Knox, Bernard. The Complete Plays of Socrates: Antigone Introduction. Robert Fagles, trans. New York: Penguin Books. 1980.
  • Sophocles. Three Theban Plays: Antigone, Oedipus the King, Oedipus and Colonus. Robert Fagles, trans. New York: Penguin Books. 1980.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

The Hubris of Creon and Antigone (2011, November 05) Retrieved February 05, 2023, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-hubris-of-creon-and-antigone-148763/

MLA Format

"The Hubris of Creon and Antigone" 05 November 2011. Web. 05 February. 2023. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-hubris-of-creon-and-antigone-148763/>

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