The Beliefs of W.E.B DuBois Term Paper by scribbler

The Beliefs of W.E.B DuBois
A brief discussion on the beliefs and racial theories of W.E.B. Du Bois.
# 152913 | 942 words | 6 sources | MLA | 2013 | US


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Description:

The paper discusses how Dr. DuBois was deeply concerned with racial inequities and fought for the civil rights of African Americans until his death. The paper relates that DuBois is known for his rejection of Booker T. Washington's theory on the submissive assimilation of African Americans into white society; the paper explains how DuBois felt that blacks should assimilate into white society through self-assertion and education. The paper concludes that whether people agree with the beliefs of Dr. DuBois or not, he should be commended for being a catalyst for the civil rights movement and for access to a quality education for all.

From the Paper:

"William Edward Burghardt Du Bois, better known as WEB Du Bois is best known for being an African American civil rights activist. However, this was only one of the many hats Dr. Du Bois wore. He was also a sociologist, a philosopher, a writer and many other things. He was born on February 23, 1868 in Great Barrington, Massachusetts and died on August 27, 1963 in Accra, Ghana. He was the first African American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Dr. Du Bois was deeply concerned with racial inequities and fought for the civil rights of African Americans until his death.
"Of the many things that Dr. Du Bois is known for is his rejection of Booker T. Washington's theory on the assimilation of African Americans into white society. Washington felt that the easiest way for blacks to assimilate was through submission. Du Bois was opposed to this theory and felt that blacks should assimilate into white society through self-assertion (Goodings-Williams p. 127). Du Bois did not equate self-assertion with violence as a way of assimilation. He believed in education and in particular liberal education as a way for blacks to successfully integrate themselves into white society."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Cain, William E. "Violence, Revolution and the Cost of Freedom: John Brown and W.E.B. Du Bois." Boundary 2 17.1 (1990): 305-330.
  • Coviello, Peter. "Intimacy and Affliction: DuBois, Race and Psychoanalysis." Modern Language Quarterly 64.1 (2003): 1-33.
  • English, Daylanne. "W.E.B. Du Bois's Family Crisis." American Literature 72.2 (2000): 291-319.
  • Gabbidon, Shaun L. "An Early American Crime Poll by W.E.B. DuBois." The Western Journal of Black Studies 24.3 (2000): 167-174.
  • Gooding-Williams, Robert. "Politics, Racial Solidarity, Exodus!" Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18.2 (2004): 118-128.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

The Beliefs of W.E.B DuBois (2013, April 30) Retrieved August 22, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-beliefs-of-w-e-b-dubois-152913/

MLA Format

"The Beliefs of W.E.B DuBois" 30 April 2013. Web. 22 August. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/the-beliefs-of-w-e-b-dubois-152913/>

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