Study of Different Tales from "The Canterbury Tales" Term Paper by ABCs

Study of Different Tales from "The Canterbury Tales"
A discussion of several tales from Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales".
# 114387 | 1,343 words | 4 sources | MLA | 2009 | US
Published on Jun 08, 2009 in Literature (English)


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Description:

The paper examines several of Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Canterbury Tales" including "The Wife of Bath's Tale," "The Miller's Tale," "The Pardoner's Tale" and "The Oxford Scholar's Tale". The paper posits that "The Oxford Scholar's Tale" is superior to other tales in the collection because it teaches as well as entertains and it is the best example of sentence and solas.

From the Paper:

"Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales are notorious for many reasons. For one, they allow us to take a different look at the medieval world and the people that inhabited it. We can see that their world was full of just as many colorful characters as ours is today and despite the lack of technology, they managed to communicate with each other and have a good time with no problems. Chaucer was an astute study of character and his stories reveal just how much man really does not change over the centuries. While he was entertaining his audience, he was also informing them. Through his tales, he exposed many different types of rascals and scoundrels up against the solid moral and ethical ideals to which we are accustomed. That Chaucer could deliver a strong message and do it with style and humor, demonstrates his talent as a writer."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Chaucer, Geoffrey. "The Miller's Tale." The Canterbury Tales. Nevill Coghill, trans. New York: Penguin Books, Hamilton: 1977.
  • Chaucer, Geoffrey. "The Oxford Scholar's Tale." The Canterbury Tales. Nevill Coghill, trans. New York: Penguin Books, Hamilton: 1977.
  • Chaucer, Geoffrey. "The Pardoner's Tale." The Canterbury Tales. Nevill Coghill, trans. New York: Penguin Books, Hamilton: 1977.
  • Chaucer, Geoffrey. "The Wife of Bath's Tale." The Canterbury Tales. Nevill Coghill, trans. New York: Penguin Books, Hamilton: 1977.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Study of Different Tales from "The Canterbury Tales" (2009, June 08) Retrieved July 11, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/study-of-different-tales-from-the-canterbury-tales-114387/

MLA Format

"Study of Different Tales from "The Canterbury Tales"" 08 June 2009. Web. 11 July. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/study-of-different-tales-from-the-canterbury-tales-114387/>

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