Spanish Immigration Term Paper by Nicky

Spanish Immigration
An exploration of the problems faced by the immigrant population in Spain in terms of the immigration process itself and problems occurring following immigration.
# 128769 | 2,701 words | 21 sources | MLA | 2010 | US


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Description:

The paper shows how, originally, illegal aliens were even welcomed, and given opportunities to obtain gainful citizenship in Spain. However, the paper relates that over time, unemployment rose, housing costs rose, and the housing market has taken a downturn, and so immigrants in Spain now find themselves unwelcome. The paper describes how many are killed en route, and those who do make it to Spain often find themselves immediately dumped outside of the border. The paper further describes how those who do manage to stay are subjected to lower incomes, a lower standard for working conditions and housing, violence, and social stigmata. The paper looks at Spain's steps to improve the situation, but believes that the rising violence and outrage among immigrants will soon make the situation out of control. The paper reaches the conclusion that unless more protections are put into place, the future for many of Spain's immigrant population may be bleak.

From the Paper:

"Much of the problem of immigration in Spain began with the amnesty granted to immigrants in 2005 (Kern, 1). At the time, there were more than one million illegal immigrants living and working within Spanish borders (BBC, 1). In an effort to make those citizens part of the government system, Socialist Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero developed an amnesty plan. The plan required immigrants to submit proof they had been living in Spain for at least six months, and provide a contract from a company willing to hire them for six months or more. Provided the immigrant had no criminal record, he or she could qualify as a Spanish citizen, meaning he or she could obtain emergency medical care (Sanchez, 1). By the end of the year, nearly 700,000 immigrants had responded (Kern, 1)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Abend, Lisa. "Spain Tries to Buy Out Immigrants." TIME. 20 October 2008. TIME, Inc. 15 November 2008. <http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1852000,00.html>.
  • Alfieri, Carlos. "SPAIN: Immigrants Make the Economy Grow." InterPress Service. 30 August 2006. IPS. 15 November 2008. <http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=34509>.
  • Amnesty International. "Spain: The Southern Boarder." Amnesty International. 2007. AI Index: EUR 41/008/2005. Amnesty International. 15 November 2008. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/document.php?lang=e&id=D095D2398CF720C98025700A00634EBE>.
  • Artiles, Antonio. "Impact of Immigration On Employment and Pay Examined." Eironline. 02 March 2004. European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. 15 November 2008. <http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/eiro/2004/01/feature/es0401204f.htm>.
  • BBC. "Spain Launches Immigrant Amnesty." BBC News. 7 February 2005. BBC. 15 November 2008. <http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/4242411.stm>.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Spanish Immigration (2010, August 06) Retrieved May 26, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/spanish-immigration-128769/

MLA Format

"Spanish Immigration" 06 August 2010. Web. 26 May. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/spanish-immigration-128769/>

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