Rousseau, Dewey and James on Education Term Paper by scribbler

Rousseau, Dewey and James on Education
A brief review of the philosophies of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and William James on educational curriculum.
# 152838 | 739 words | 4 sources | APA | 2013 | US
Published on Apr 30, 2013 in Education (Theory) , Philosophy (General)


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Description:

The paper examines the two basic views of education that are that humans are born with the innate right to learn and self-actualize to their highest degree, and that humans require a strict hierarchy of learning, which then leads to a similar hierarchy within their social contract. The paper focuses on the philosophies of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and William James to determine their approaches to educational issues and the manner in which childhood educational curriculum should be developed. The paper concludes that the debate remains vital in the contemporary world as teachers face increasing pressures and there is the ongoing impact of diversity and globalization.

From the Paper:

"Learning is a life-long adventure in the philosophy of discovery. To maximize learning, one cannot underestimate two things: learning opportunities and the environment surrounding the learning activity. Learning opportunities must be interesting, meaningful, and purposeful for learners - particularly children. At the very crux of the ideas surrounding the philosophy of education, however, there are two basic views: 1) humans are born with the innate right to learn and self-actualize to their highest degree, or; 2) humans require a strict hierarchy of learning, which then leads to a similar hierarchy within their social contract. To examine these views, we will focus on the philosophies of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and William James and their approach to educational issues. Each presented a view of pragmatism, even though it was not really defined until James and Dewey came on the scene. Rousseau certainly presented a precursor to both views.
"18th century philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau's novel Emile, in fact, describes the ideal educational system in the guise of fiction, but adhering to his views of society, self-actualization, and human nature. Humans are born into a natural sense of goodness and until society influences them, are uncorrupt. It is the educator's responsibility to prevent that for as long as possible by acting as a shield to allow children to develop more naturally (Rousseau, 2003)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Flack, W. and J. Laird, eds. (1998). Emotions in Psychopathology: Theory and Research.Oxford University Press.
  • Henson, K. (2003). "Foundations for Learner-Centered Education." Education. 124 (1): 5+
  • Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Translated by William H. Payne. (2003). Emile: or Treatise onEducation. Prometheus Books.
  • Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Translated by Donald A. Cress. (1992). Discourse on the OriginOf Inequality. Hackett Publications.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Rousseau, Dewey and James on Education (2013, April 30) Retrieved January 17, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/rousseau-dewey-and-james-on-education-152838/

MLA Format

"Rousseau, Dewey and James on Education" 30 April 2013. Web. 17 January. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/rousseau-dewey-and-james-on-education-152838/>

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