"Parable of the Prodigal Son": Psychological and Biblical Analysis Term Paper by Artemis

A discussion on the roles of the characters in the "Parable of the Prodigal Son" using biblical and psychological concepts.
# 151516 | 1,481 words | 4 sources | MLA | 2012 | US


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Description:

This paper discusses how the parable of the father and two sons is a common parable that is shared and is also one that many people relate with on a variety of levels. It is a universal story of falling away from the "right" path and the grace and forgiveness that can be extended as healing takes place. In particular, the paper discusses how the story goes beyond religious beliefs and has accessed our individual and cultural psyches in a way that many of the other parables fail to do and how, because of the theologically transcendent message of the parable of the father and two sons, it is clear that there are deeper, psychological meanings behind the parable. The paper attemps to examine the meaning of this often-shared parable utilizing both the fields of theology and psychology.

From the Paper:

"While psychology and theology may not appear to mix on the surface, there are universal principles that do seem to intersect between one another. Paulson Veliyannoor has taken both a Biblical and Jungian psychoanalytic approach at examining the parable of the father and two sons. Jung wrote extensively about the collective unconscious, which are the character and story archetypes that accumulated throughout the development of history . The collective unconscious is accessed through dreams, stories, images etc, and the aspects of the collective unconscious hold a common theme for people across time and cultural boarders. Similarly, Mary Ann Tolbert examines the role of id, ego, and superego, which also describe the functions of the conscious and unconscious mind. The id is described by libidinal, impulsive forces and is countered by the super ego, which is about rules and regulations . The ego is the mediator between the id and super ego, and the ego is the highest psychological level to attain. "

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Griffin, Graeme M. "Whatever became of joy." Journal Of Pastoral Care 40, no. 2 (June 1, 1986): 143-149. ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials, EBSCOhost (accessed April 15, 2012).
  • Robbins, Susan, Chatterjee, Pranab, and Edward Canda. Contemporary Human Behavior Theory: A Critical Perspective for Social Work. Boston: Pearson Education, 2006.
  • Tolbert, Mary Ann. "Prodigal son: an essay in literary criticism from a psychoanalytic perspective." Semeia no. 9 (January 1, 1977): 1-20. ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials, EBSCOhost (accessed April 15, 2012).
  • Veliyannoor, Paulson V. "The parable of a father and two sons: Jungian hermeneutics and therapeutic applications." Journal Of Psychology And Christianity 28, no. 4 (December 1, 2009): 338-349. ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials, EBSCOhost (accessed April 15, 2012).

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

"Parable of the Prodigal Son": Psychological and Biblical Analysis (2012, June 19) Retrieved September 23, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/parable-of-the-prodigal-son-psychological-and-biblical-analysis-151516/

MLA Format

""Parable of the Prodigal Son": Psychological and Biblical Analysis" 19 June 2012. Web. 23 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/parable-of-the-prodigal-son-psychological-and-biblical-analysis-151516/>

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