Nuclear Weapons and the Cold War Term Paper by Master Researcher

Nuclear Weapons and the Cold War
A look at the efforts of the U.S. and the Soviet Union to determine the level of nuclear threat they faced during the Cold War.
# 35221 | 900 words | 4 sources | MLA | 2002 | US


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Description:

This paper evaluates how much the United States and the Soviet Union knew about each others nuclear capability during the Cold War. The paper describes how from the beginning of the Cold War in 1948 and the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, both nations applied intense efforts to determine the level of threat each of them faced through espionage and satellites. The paper discusses how the Pentagon frequently overestimated the number of nuclear missiles and bombers the Soviet Union had operational, at least publicly, in order to gain public and political support for bigger defense budgets.

From the Paper:

"Throughout the Cold War, the United States and the Soviet Union were constantly concerned about the danger of nuclear attack. Between the beginning of the Cold War in 1948 and the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991, both nations applied intense efforts to determine the level of threat each of them faced. These efforts met with mixed success in the early years of the Cold War, but were refined to such a degree that by the nineteen-eighties both sides were very aware of the other side's nuclear capabilities.
"The Soviet Union first learned of the American atomic weapons development at Potsdam in 1945, when President Truman told Soviet Premier Josef Stalin that the United States had a new weapon of tremendous power. Stalin dismissed the news as hardly worthy of his attention, either because he didn't initially understand the significance of the bomb Truman mentioned, or because he didn't want to reveal his concern that the Soviet Union had no such weapon at the time."

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Nuclear Weapons and the Cold War (2003, September 23) Retrieved April 20, 2024, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/nuclear-weapons-and-the-cold-war-35221/

MLA Format

"Nuclear Weapons and the Cold War" 23 September 2003. Web. 20 April. 2024. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/nuclear-weapons-and-the-cold-war-35221/>

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