Nat Turner: Slave Resistance and Revolution for Freedom Term Paper by Quality Writers

Nat Turner: Slave Resistance and Revolution for Freedom
A discussion of Nat Turner's inspiring story of slave resistance, and its implications for America today.
# 103998 | 1,143 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2008 | US


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Description:

This paper examines the story of Nat Turner's rebellion and its effect on slave resistance. The paper explains that Turner's story is significant because it meant different things for many people in America. For blacks, Turner was a symbol of hope and resistance, and to Southern whites, he represented their greatest fear, that the oppressed blacks would not tolerate their conditions much longer. The paper looks at how Turner's "confession" helped to galvanize the anti-slavery movement in the North. The paper then points out that it is important that Americans acknowledge the slave rebellions because they meant so many different things to many different people. The paper also suggests that knowing that slaves fought courageously for their natural rights might inspire modern-day African Americans and replace some of the defeatist attitude that is evident in some black cultures. It would also make white America acknowledge their sins of the past and come to terms with them. The writer believes that by understanding and acknowledging America's dark past, the country can make a better effort to atone for the mistakes of the past by helping many African Americans bring their standard of living up to that of other American ethnic groups.

From the Paper:

"Before he died, he told his story to Thomas Gray, who turned it into the book, "The Confessions of Nat Turner". Gray manipulated much of Turner's story to portray the rebellious slaves not as people pushed to their limits and fighting for their natural rights, but as savages bent on bloodthirsty revenge. This story sent shockwaves throughout the divided country. Many Southerners used it as justification to commit violent crimes against blacks and to enforce stricter slavery laws."

Turner's story is significant because it meant different things for many people in America. For blacks, Turner was a symbol of hope and resistance. He was a spiritual man who was doing what God had told him to do. To Southern whites, he represented their greatest fear, that the oppressed blacks would not tolerate their conditions much longer. His "confession" helped to galvanize the anti-slavery movement in the North."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Berlin, Ira, Favreau, Mark, and Miller, Steven. Ed. Remembering Slavery. New York: The New Press. 1998.
  • Gray, Thomas. The Confessions of Nat Turner. United States. 1831.
  • http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/phl302/texts/locke/locke2/locke2nd-a.html. Second Treatise of Government. 94 Oct. John Locke. 1 May 2007.
  • http://www.philosophypages.com/hy/4n.htm. Locke:Social Order. 18 October 2006. Garth Kamerling. 1 May 2007.
  • http://www.umich.edu/~ece/student_projects/slavery2/politics2.html. Political Perspectives. 30 April 2002. University of Michigan. 1 May 2007.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Nat Turner: Slave Resistance and Revolution for Freedom (2008, May 30) Retrieved August 13, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/nat-turner-slave-resistance-and-revolution-for-freedom-103998/

MLA Format

"Nat Turner: Slave Resistance and Revolution for Freedom" 30 May 2008. Web. 13 August. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/nat-turner-slave-resistance-and-revolution-for-freedom-103998/>

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