International Relations and China - Theory and Reality Term Paper by Nicky

A look at how theories of international relations apply to world conflicts.
# 151096 | 2,321 words | 7 sources | MLA | 2012 | US


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Description:

This paper examines various competing theories of international relations, focusing on realism and liberalism. According to the paper, these theories are important in explaining the behavior of states and interactions between and among states. Both approaches are defined and elaborated on at length. Then the paper applies these approaches to China and its diplomatic policy as an emerging power. Additionally, the paper challenges traditionally held beliefs about international relations, such as that democratic states are more peaceful than authoritarian states. Various other theories are also explored, such as constructivism, which is applied to the current situation in Darfur. The paper concludes by addressing how many international conflicts are intertwined with those of other nations.

From the Paper:

"Conflict or the propensity for conflict between and among states is central to the position of realism. Realism is more pessimistic in nature than the liberalism. It adheres to the idea that since international relations exist in an anarchic system, or the absence of a central power to resolve conflicts between nations, there is a constant struggle for power among self-serving states; thus, eradicating conflict and war is highly unlikely.
"Thus, if taken from the realist perspective, United States policy should be directed more towards the containment of China if the U.S. wishes to serve their ambitions and self-interests. Further, to maintain its status as the world's greatest superpower, it is only appropriate that the U.S. arrest the growing power that is China."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), "Q&A: Sudan's Darfur Conflict," BBC News. 27 August 2009, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/3496731.stm, accessed (23 September 2009).
  • Betts, Richard K. "Part II: International Realism: Anarchy and Power." Conflict After the Cold War: Arguments on Causes of War and Peace, updated 3rd ed. Ed. Richard K. Betts. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2008, 53-55.
  • Finnemore, Martha. "Constructing Norms of Humanitarian Intervention." Conflict After the Cold War: Arguments on Causes of War and Peace, updated 3rd ed. Ed. Richard K. Betts. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2008, 236-238, 249-251.
  • Thucydides. "The Melian Dialogue." Conflict After the Cold War: Arguments on Causes of War and Peace, updated 3rd ed. Ed. Richard K. Betts. New York: Pearson/Longman, 2008, 56-60.
  • Walt, Stephen M. "International Relations: One World, Many Theories." Foreign Policy 110 (Spring 1998): 29-46.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

International Relations and China - Theory and Reality (2012, May 22) Retrieved November 27, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/international-relations-and-china-theory-and-reality-151096/

MLA Format

"International Relations and China - Theory and Reality" 22 May 2012. Web. 27 November. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/international-relations-and-china-theory-and-reality-151096/>

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