International Law and New Zealand Term Paper by Metro

International Law and New Zealand
A look at how international law is developed and affects New Zealand.
# 151830 | 1,487 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2012 | NZ


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Description:

This paper examines the process of developing international law and it acceptance by nations. First, the paper defines international law, noting that it is concerned with the rights and obligations of one State in respect to another. Then it discusses how international law is voluntary and therefore must be accepted by states individually. Next, the paper addresses the role of international organizations in creating international law. Finally, the paper considers the impact of international law on New Zealand. The paper concludes by stating that international law is a product of the voluntary actions of the States to which it applies, and not from a majority rule.

From the Paper:

"To understand how the making of international law involves the voluntary actions of the States to which it applies, the concept of international law itself must be explained. For the purposes of this essay, international law will refer to the public sector; relations between States, and not the private; between corporations or private relations. One of the main features of international law is that "most of its rules aim at regulating the behaviour of States, not of individuals," because "States are the principal actors on the international scene." International law is therefore concerned with the rights and obligations of one State in respect with another. Such rights can include the issuing of passports, river usage (where a river crosses State borders), or the right to visit nationals who have been detained in another country. It is unlike the laws States govern at a national level, for despite having penal statutes, there is no sovereign authority or central international government handing down laws. Instead, States bind themselves through consensus where they are able to enter and withdraw; it is voluntary in nature, unlike domestic law where there is no choice in the matter, and citizens of states must follow their country's laws whether they agree with them..."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Cassese, Antonio & Weiler, Joseph H Change and Stability in International Law Making (deGruyter, 1998)
  • Cassese, Antonio International Law (2nd ed, Oxford University Press, New York, 2005)
  • Conte, Alex An Introduction to International Law (Lexis Nexis, Wellington, 2006)
  • Dixon, Martin Textbook on International Law (6th ed, Oxford University Press, New York, 2007)
  • Martin-Ortega, Olga & Wallace, Rebecca International Law (6th ed, Sweet and Maxwell, London, 2009)

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

International Law and New Zealand (2012, October 11) Retrieved April 04, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/international-law-and-new-zealand-151830/

MLA Format

"International Law and New Zealand" 11 October 2012. Web. 04 April. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/international-law-and-new-zealand-151830/>

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