Homosexuality Term Paper by writingsensation

Homosexuality
A discussion on homosexuality in the John Cameron's play "Hedwig and the Angry Inch".
# 75797 | 2,524 words | 9 sources | MLA | 2006 | US


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Description:

This paper reviews the topic of polymorphous sexuality and gender confusion. It explores the character and its story in "Hedwig and the Angry Inch", commenting on the famous song "The Origins of Love". The author also contrasts and compares the philosophy of the play with Greek, Viking and Egyptian mythology on androgynous man.

From the Paper:

"The beginning of the song "When the earth was still flat, and the clouds made of fire, and mountains stretched up to the sky, sometimes higher..." (Trask) is clearly meant to send us back in thought to those elements of the creation myth which are nearly universally shared. Though by the time of Plato many philosophers had already discovered that the earth was round and even theorized its tilt and rotation (Psigate), the myths of the era still spoke of the flat earth and the mountains which upheld the sky. Most cultures speak of something--be it a mountain, a tree, or a god--which holds the sky and earth apart. The shape of the earth (square), and the separation of earth and sky by a pillar/mountain/tree, were both spiritual metaphors refering to the state of the soul. Myths, in ancient Greece and most likely in most other ancient cultures, were understood by the wise to be allegorical and spiritual in nature. By starting with myths such as the earth being flat, Hedwig acknowledges that the story he/she is about to tell is also metaphorical, but that it should be taken as presenting some kind of real truth about our souls."

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APA Format

Homosexuality (2006, December 21) Retrieved April 20, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/homosexuality-75797/

MLA Format

"Homosexuality" 21 December 2006. Web. 20 April. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/homosexuality-75797/>

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