Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility Term Paper by Nicky

A discussion on the issues of corporate social responsibility and government regulation in today's business world.
# 149761 | 2,700 words | 6 sources | APA | 2011 | US
Published on Dec 30, 2011 in Political Science (U.S.) , Business (General) , Ethics (General)


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Description:

The paper explores the concepts of corporate greed, corporate social responsibility and government regulation and oversight, and addresses how recent events brought the markets down in America and around the world in lieu of government regulation and oversight. The paper discusses how people are confusing the legal responsibility of the corporate world to provide consumers and investors with true and accurate business reporting with a moral or social responsibility to do so. The paper also highlights how the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) performs its legal oversight of corporate America without a true social conscience. The paper reaches the conclusion that the only solution is to take the social conscience out of business, so that it can be perceived for what it is: profit focused production and operations for which the consumer receives that which is purchased from that company. The paper emphasizes that consumerism, not social conscience, drives the success and the profitability of corporate America.

Outline:
Introduction
Corporate Social Responsibility
Government Oversight and Regulation of Publicly Traded Companies
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"The responsibility of any publicly traded corporation is to the profit line, and to the shareholders who have invested in the business and who expect to realize a return on their investment. In the past two decades, however, corporate America has been called upon to take a more involved role in the overall welfare of society (Angelidis and Ibrahim, 1993). The pressure brought to bear on corporations by social groups and special interest groups caused the corporations to create codes of ethical standards, which in effect had little to do with the business of the corporation (Angelidis and Ibrahim, 1993). Many businesses have paid a special attention over the past two decades to the social impact of their production and business (Angelidis and Ibrahim, 1993).
"These expectations imposed upon Corporate America by the public has, Angelidis and Ibrahim say, left corporate America somewhat perplexed (1993, p. 7). Social conscience has not until recent times been a part of the corporate structure or responsibility. In America, the quid pro quo between society and consumers has always been the product or service produced by corporate America. The corporate social conscience, to the extent that we can tie social conscience and business together, has been largely satisfied by individuals whose fortunes arose from their business acumen pursued individual and private philanthropy."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Anderson, Jonas V. 2008. Regulating Corporations the American Way: Why Exhaustive Rules and Just Deserts Are the Mainstay of U.S. Corporate Governance. Duke Law Journal 57, no. 4: 1081+. Database on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5027008674. Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.
  • Angelidis, John P., and Nabil A. Ibrahim. 1993. Social Demand and Corporate Supply: A Corporate Social Responsibility Model. Review of Business 15, no. 1: 7+. Database on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001675246. Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.
  • Bavly, Dan A. 1999. Corporate Governance and Accountability: What Role for the Regulator, Director, and Auditor?. Westport, CT: Quorum Books. Book on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=114694551. Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.
  • Besser, Terry L. 2002. The Conscience of Capitalism: Business Social Responsibility to Communities. Westport, CT: Praeger. Book on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106996136. Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.
  • Cox, James D., Randall S. Thomas, and Dana Kiku. 2003. SEC Enforcement Heuristics: An Empirical Inquiry. Duke Law Journal 53, no. 2: 737+. Database on-line. Available from Questia, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5006399949. Internet. Accessed 16 June 2009.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility (2011, December 30) Retrieved October 14, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/corporate-governance-and-social-responsibility-149761/

MLA Format

"Corporate Governance and Social Responsibility" 30 December 2011. Web. 14 October. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/corporate-governance-and-social-responsibility-149761/>

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