Chicano Culture and Operation Wetback Term Paper by scribbler

Chicano Culture and Operation Wetback
A look at "Operation Wetback" and Chicano history.
# 151975 | 1,200 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2012 | US


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Description:

This paper discusses the infamous Operation Wetback that took place along the Mexican border from 1954 through 1955, and its contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. First, the paper gives an overview of US-Mexican relations in regard to immigration issues, pointing out that they were not always contentious. In particular, it notes the "The Bracero Program" that allowed agricultural workers to enter the US at certain points in the year. Then, the paper notes the impact of the Cold War on immigration policies with Mexico. Finally, the paper describes "Operation Wetback" in detail, highlighting some practices that were considered violations of civil rights, and their impact on the nascent Chicano civil rights movement. The paper concludes by stating that "Operation Wetback" helped fuel the Chicano Civil Rights movement that eventually swept the Mexican-American community and helped gain them more rights and benefits in their work and everyday lives.

From the Paper:

"In the 1950s, American was right in the middle of the Cold War with Russia, and the people were frightened of anything connected with Communism. When Operation Wetback started, the country was watching the McCarthy hearings, in which Senator Eugene McCarthy was busy accusing everyone from fellow Congressmen to Hollywood actors of being Communists. It was called the "red scare," and it spread quickly across they country. In Washington, D.C., it also spread to illegal aliens, widely affecting the Chicano community of the time. The U.S. Attorney General started Operation Wetback as a way to round up aliens, using the Communist threat as a factor in the round up. Two other authors note, "Attorney General Herbert Brownell ordered a massive roundup and deportation of aliens without immigration papers, allegedly in order to protect the United States from communist infiltration" (Meier, and Gutierrez 171). In reality, most of the nearly one million Mexican-Americans that were deported had no Communist ties, and many legal U.S. citizens were included in the round up. The operation began in California, and then went to Texas, Illinois, Missouri, and Washington State (Meier, and Gutierrez 171). It was a huge operation involving thousands of people, and it altered Chicano history forever."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Dillin, John. "How Eisenhower solved illegal border crossings from Mexico." The Christian Science Monitor. 6 July 2006.
  • McMahon, Marci R. "Politicizing Spanish-Mexican Domesticity, Redefining Fronteras: Jovita Gonzalez's Caballero and Cleofas Jaramillo's Romance of a Little Village Girl." Frontiers - A Journal of Women's Studies 28.1-2 (2007): 232+.
  • Meier, Matt S., and Margo Gutierrez. Encyclopedia of the Mexican American Civil Rights Movement. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2000.
  • Rose, Susan, and Sarah Hiller. "From Migrant Work to Community Transformation: Families Forming Transnational Communities in Periban and Pennsylvania." The Oral History Review 34.1 (2007): 95+.
  • Tichenor, Daniel J. Dividing Lines: The Politics of Immigration Control in America. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2002.

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Chicano Culture and Operation Wetback (2012, November 04) Retrieved May 25, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/chicano-culture-and-operation-wetback-151975/

MLA Format

"Chicano Culture and Operation Wetback" 04 November 2012. Web. 25 May. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/chicano-culture-and-operation-wetback-151975/>

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