Challenges of Japanese Culture for Law Enforcement Term Paper by scribbler

Challenges of Japanese Culture for Law Enforcement
This paper examines communication issues for law enforcement involving the Japanese culture.
# 152942 | 1,247 words | 3 sources | APA | 2013 | US


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Description:

The paper describes specific communication characteristics in Japanese culture that include the role of criticism, saving face and personal space, indicating agreement and laughter. The paper explains the traits of vagueness, a humble demeanor, indirectness and ambiguity, and provides a list of tips for communicating with Japanese individuals. The paper then considers the implications of these communication characteristics for the law enforcement officer who deals with a Japanese individual.

Outline:
Specific Communication Characteristics in Japanese Culture
Criticism, Saving Face and Personal Space
Indicating Agreement in Japanese Communications
Laughter in Japanese Communication
Implications for Law Enforcement Officers
Summary & Conclusion

From the Paper:

"It is important for the law enforcement officer to understand that the Japanese people often provide vague answers when questioned, do not like to say no, and will not tell the individual with whom they are communicating if they fail to understand what is being said. (Nyman, 2002, paraphrased) The work of Fuki echoes this fact, stating that the following are ways that the Japanese individual will state 'no' while indicating 'yes':
(1) To imply no but say yes and then follow with an explanation that may take up to half and hour and which effectively means 'no';
(2) To be vague, ambiguous and evasive in replying so as the other side loses track of what the issue was;
(3) To simply not answer the question and leave the matter unattended;
(4) Abruptly changing subjects;
(5) Criticizing the other party; and
(6) Assuming a highly apologetic tone. (Fuki, 2002)
Statements such as "it will be difficult' actually means that the Japanese individual does not feel that what has been requested of them can actually done.(Nyman, n.d., paraphrased) The Japanese also will leave sentences unfinished quite often and allow the other individual with whom they are communicating to finish the sentence in their own mind. (Nyman, n.d., paraphrased) When the Japanese individual cannot tell one what they might want or need to know it is likely that they will make up an answer to accommodate the question. (Nyman, n.d., paraphrased)"

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Ruch, W. V. (1984). Corporate communications. Wesport, CT: Quorum Books in: Fuki, Nakai (2002) The Role of Cultural Influences in Japanese Communication: A Literature Review on Social and Situational Factors and Japanese Indirectness. Japanese Communication Features: A Critical Examination. Issue 14.
  • Fuki, Nakai (2002) The Role of Cultural Influences in Japanese Communication: A Literature Review on Social and Situational Factors and Japanese Indirectness. Japanese Communication Features: A Critical Examination. Issue 14.
  • Nyman, R. (n.d.) Japanese Communication Style. Doing Business in Japan. Retrieved from: http://www.rikkinyman.com/training/japanese_culture/communication.htm

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Challenges of Japanese Culture for Law Enforcement (2013, May 01) Retrieved November 20, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/challenges-of-japanese-culture-for-law-enforcement-152942/

MLA Format

"Challenges of Japanese Culture for Law Enforcement" 01 May 2013. Web. 20 November. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/challenges-of-japanese-culture-for-law-enforcement-152942/>

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