Assessing Canada's Success in Reconciling Competing Interests in Training Term Paper

The paper looks at the conflicting interests that exist between the needs of Canadian corporations to maximize their profit margins against the need to provide employees with training in order to improve their status and living standards.
# 151716 | 2,730 words | 13 sources | APA | 2012 | CA


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Description:

The paper examines the challenges that Canada, as a developed country, is facing as part of a globalized industrial economy in reconciling competing training interests. The writer opens by providing an overview of Canada's economic development up to the present day. Following this, the writer examines, in depth, the various stakeholder training interests and discuss how, or indeed if, this is being reconciled within Canada's current economic climate.
Outline
Historical Context
Capital's Interests
Government
Worker's Interests
Union's Interests

From the Paper:

"Canada, as a developed country, is facing the same situation as the rest of the industrialized global economy particularly the challenges in reconciling competing interests in training. You may not be up-to-date on Canadian history so I will overview our economic development history to present day giving a context for discussion. I will attempt to give depth to different stakeholder training interests and, how or if, this is being reconciled within our current climate. As you will see, Canada is not just a frozen wasteland but a dynamic and changing landscape of competing interests on training.
"In the 1860s, Canada's industrial revolution began and with it came new machinery requiring operation by trained workers. Since then, Canada's tensions between capital and labour in providing training for 'good' jobs to provide a family wage has escalated. This is true for most developed or developing countries since labor wants access to 'good' jobs and thus comfortable living conditions."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Bakan, J. (2004). The corporation: The pathological pursuit of profit and power. Toronto: Penguin Canada. ISBN 0-14-029004-0.
  • Beltrame, J. (2012). IMF slashes growth forecast for Canadian economy. Ottawa: The Toronto Star. Retrieved on January 24, 2012 from http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1120330--imf-slashes-growth-forecast-for-canadian-economy
  • Betcherman, G., McMullen, K., and Davidman, K. (1998). Training for the New Economy, Ottawa: Canadian Policy Research Networks.
  • Brown, L. (2012). Older students not eligible for Ontario tuition rebate. Toronto: The Toronto Star. Retrieved on January 15, 2012 from http://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/article/1115343--older-students-not-eligible-for-ontario-tuition-rebate
  • Campion-Smith, B. (2012). Stephen Harper vows big changes to retirement benefits and immigration policy. Ottawa: The Toronto Star. Retrieved on January 26, 2012 from http://www.thestar.com/news/article/1122179--stephen-harper-vows-big-changes-to-retirement-benefits-and-immigration-policy?bn=1

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Assessing Canada's Success in Reconciling Competing Interests in Training (2012, September 04) Retrieved September 23, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/assessing-canada-success-in-reconciling-competing-interests-in-training-151716/

MLA Format

"Assessing Canada's Success in Reconciling Competing Interests in Training" 04 September 2012. Web. 23 September. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/assessing-canada-success-in-reconciling-competing-interests-in-training-151716/>

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