Anxiety, Mood, Dissociative, and Somatoform Disorders Term Paper by jlatigue

Anxiety, Mood, Dissociative, and Somatoform Disorders
An explanation of how mental disorders are classified.
# 147797 | 1,130 words | 4 sources | APA | 2011 | US
Published on Jul 11, 2011 in Psychology (Disorders)


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Description:

This paper explains how the DSM-IV offers diagnostic categories and classifications for the use of identifying and diagnosing mental disorders. It goes on to discuss anxiety disorders, mood and affective disorders, dissociative disorders, and somatoform disorders, as well as the possible classifications and symptoms under these categories. In addition to explaining the disorders as per the DSM-IV, a specific disorder within each category is broken down and explained in biological, cognitive, behavioral and emotional terms.

Outline:
Anxiety Disorders
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Mood and Affective Disorders
Cyclothymic Disorder
Dissociative Disorders
Dissociative Amnesia
Somatoform Disorders
Body Dysmorphic Disorder
Conclusion

From the Paper:

''The DSM-IV offers diagnostic categories and classifications for the use of identifying and diagnosing mental disorders (Hansell Damour, 2008). This paper will specifically cover anxiety disorders, mood and affective disorders, dissociative disorders, and somatoform disorders, as well as the possible classifications and symptoms under these categories. In addition to explaining the disorders as per the DSM-IV, a specific disorder within each category will be broken down and explained in biological, cognitive, behavioral and emotional terms.
''The difference between fear and anxiety is that fear is geared toward something specific such as a place or an object, while anxiety is more of a general feeling of apprehension about the future (Hansell & Damour, 2008). Some of the disorders that can grow out of excessive anxiety within a person are: obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While both fear and anxiety are both very natural occurrences in people, when these sensations are felt in an extreme sense there is the real possibility of an anxiety disorder. According to the Office of the Surgeon General (n.d.), "Anxiety, which may be understood as the pathological counterpart of normal fear, is manifest by disturbances of mood, as well as of thinking, behavior, and physiological activity" (Anxiety Disorders, para. 1).''

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Hansell, J., & Damour, L. (2008). Abnormal psychology (2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  • Office of the Surgeon General. (n.d.). Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General. Retrieved from http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/mentalhealth/chapter4/sec2.html
  • The Cleveland Clinic. (1995-2011). Diseases & Conditions. Retrieved from http://my.clevelandclinic.org/disorders/Body_Dysmorphic_Disorder_BDD/hic_Body_Dysmorphic_Disorder.aspx
  • The Cleveland Clinic. (1995-2011). Diseases & Conditions. Retrieved from http://my.clevelandclinic.org/disorders/dissociative_disorders/hic_dissociative_amnesia.aspx

Cite this Term Paper:

APA Format

Anxiety, Mood, Dissociative, and Somatoform Disorders (2011, July 11) Retrieved December 06, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/term-paper/anxiety-mood-dissociative-and-somatoform-disorders-147797/

MLA Format

"Anxiety, Mood, Dissociative, and Somatoform Disorders" 11 July 2011. Web. 06 December. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/term-paper/anxiety-mood-dissociative-and-somatoform-disorders-147797/>

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