Youth and Violence in the Media Research Paper by Quality Writers

Youth and Violence in the Media
A discussion of the relationship between exposure to violent television and video games and the development of aggression in children and adolescents.
# 104171 | 1,945 words | 12 sources | APA | 2008 | US


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Description:

This paper tests the assumption that the high levels of violence in the media must be having a negative effect on children. It points out that, in particular, many seem to fear that exposure to violent television and video games will lead to the development of aggression in children and adolescents. The paper attempts to show that there is no simple answer to the questions posed by the proliferation of violent television and video games in our society. It concludes that it is by no means certain that exposure to violent television and video games leads to the development of aggression in children and adolescents.

From the Paper:

"There can be no doubt that young people are exposed to high levels of media violence. For example, one study demonstrates that 57% of television programmes depict violence (based on viewing 2,700 programs on 23 channels) (Fleras, 2003). Of this, about 10% is very graphic violence. This adds up to the average North American child watching about one really graphic violent act every day - or a total of about 2,200 very graphic, violent acts while he or she is in elementary school (Potter and Smith, 2000). Similarly, the Kaiser Family Foundation Report showed that some 75% of US children had at least one video-game player, and that a third of these children had video-game players in their own bedrooms. Moreover, many videogames contain large amounts of violence, some of it graphic (Lachlan, Smith and Tamborini, 2003). Thus, there can be no doubt that most children and adolescents view a great deal of violent television, and spend a great deal of time playing violent video games."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Ballard, Mary E. and Robert Lineberger. (1999). Video Game violence and confederate gender: effects on reward and punishment given by college males. Sex Roles: A Journal of Research: 541+.
  • Behrman, Richard E., Culross, Patti L., and Reich, Kathleen. (2002). Children, youth, and gun violence: Analysis and recommendations. The Future Of Children, 12(2): 5+.
  • Bowyer, Jane, and Komaya, Mami. (2000). College-educated mothers' ideas about television and their active mediation of viewing by three- to five-year-old children: Japan and the U.S.A. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 44(3): 349+.
  • Duin, Julia. (Nov. 24th, 1999). Video games may spur violence: Study: Self-policing better, but not good. The Washington Times: 4.
  • Fleras, Augie. (2003). Mass Media Communication in Canada. Scarborough, Ontario: Thomson Nelson.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Youth and Violence in the Media (2008, June 03) Retrieved September 26, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/youth-and-violence-in-the-media-104171/

MLA Format

"Youth and Violence in the Media" 03 June 2008. Web. 26 September. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/youth-and-violence-in-the-media-104171/>

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