Xenophobia and American Immigration Policy: The Debate Over "American" Jobs Research Paper by Nicky

A discussion of the way xenophobia helped to form the American Immigration Policy.
# 146633 | 2,740 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2010 | US
Published on Jan 07, 2011 in History (General) , Business (General) , Labor Studies (General) , Sociology (Multiculturalism)


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Description:

The paper discusses the way the American Immigration Policy was developed and describes how the policy, and the principles that helped to shape the policy, were vastly different from that of Non-Europe nations, such as Japan, that found strength in the ideal of a state based on a single ethnic group. The paper also explains how the United States faced a dilemma as a shortage of highly-skilled American workers and new immigrants appeared a good fit for employment, but lacked, in the eyes of many, reasonable prospects for cultural assimilation. The debate over American immigration would become a new xenophobia that attempted to close America's borders in the name of protecting American culture and jobs; thus, Xenophobia plays an immense role in the formulation of America's immigration policy, in particular, where that policy touches on issues of the immigration of highly-skilled foreign workers.

From the Paper:

"Nation states tend to define themselves according to cultural and ethnic characteristics. The large polities of the Ancient and Medieval worlds were essentially multi-ethnic empires, or tributary states, that consisted of numerous groups under the rule of a single people. In recent centuries, and beginning especially in Europe, these conglomerate societies gave way to large territories composed of populations united by custom, history, language, religion, and eventually - government. Such developments led directly to the creation of most modern European countries. During the course of the Nineteenth Century, and into the early Twentieth, the idea spread across much of the globe. Non-European nations, like Japan, found strength in the ideal of a state based on a single ethnic group. From the beginning; however, the United States was different. Though founded mostly under English auspices, the American colonies were, from earliest times, home to members of different cultures, ethnic groups, and religious beliefs. The United States Constitution enshrined within the nation's government notions of universal human rights. The United States - a country of vast open spaces and tremendous untapped resources - encouraged large-scale immigration. Again, most of these early immigrants came from Western Europe. But in time, as the United States industrialized, the need for labor expanded, and America's burgeoning industries drew on an ever-expanding pool of immigrants. The resulting melting pot increased American diversity and highlighted both the differences and similarities among the nation's inhabitants. Protestants, Catholics, and Jews lived side by side, and eventually, America would begin to come to terms with the sharp divisions that existed between Black and White. A long struggle for civil rights at last gave African-Americans equal rights with White Americans of whatever ethnic background. A new era was dawning - an age in which the pool of immigrants was spreading wider again, and growing deeper. By the end of the Twentieth Century and the start of the New Millennium, men and women of widely varied backgrounds were seeking American jobs in unprecedented numbers. They too wanted to live the American Dream. At the same time, the United States faced a dilemma as a shortage of highly-skilled American workers threatened to choke off American prosperity. The new immigrants appeared a good fit for employment, but lacked, in the eyes of many, reasonable prospects for cultural assimilation. The debate over American immigration would become a battle between the demands of global competitiveness, and a kind of new xenophobia, one that attempted to close America's borders in the name of protecting American culture and jobs."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Gordon, Edward E. The 2010 Meltdown: Solving the Impending Jobs Crisis. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005.
  • Karoly, Lynn A., and Constantijn W. A. Panis. The 21st Century at Work : Forces Shaping the Future Workforce and Workplace in the United States /. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 2004.
  • Koh, Harold Hongju. "Foreword: On American Exceptionalism." Stanford Law Review 55.5 (2003): 1479+.
  • Ong, Aihwa. Buddha Is Hiding: Refugees, Citizenship, the New America. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 2003..
  • Redfield, Steven. "Understanding and Addressing the Challenges of Job Loss for Low-Wage Workers." Economic Perspectives 29.2 (2005): 67+.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Xenophobia and American Immigration Policy: The Debate Over "American" Jobs (2011, January 07) Retrieved April 10, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/xenophobia-and-american-immigration-policy-the-debate-over-american-jobs-146633/

MLA Format

"Xenophobia and American Immigration Policy: The Debate Over "American" Jobs" 07 January 2011. Web. 10 April. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/xenophobia-and-american-immigration-policy-the-debate-over-american-jobs-146633/>

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