The Port Royal Experiment Research Paper by EminenceFrontman

The Port Royal Experiment
A comprehensive exploration of the Port Royal Experiment on the Sea Islands of South Carolina during the Civil War.
# 113770 | 6,618 words | 21 sources | MLA | 2009 | US


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

The paper describes in detail the Port Royal Experiment when Union forces seized the coastal Sea Islands of South Carolina and allowed the newly-freed slaves of the islands, backed by northern abolitionists, to establish a self-sustaining community of cotton farmers and merchants. The paper relates that the overall economic success of the Port Royal Experiment was limited due to the lack of crop diversification among the Sea Islands. The paper also reveals that the lessons learned on the Sea Islands were not applicable to other parts of the South. The paper explores what historians say about the Port Royal Experiment and concludes that the attempts at creating a functioning society of freed slaves on the Sea Islands was a milestone in the establishment of a post-war southern society. The paper believes that however flawed the experiment may have been, it was an important event in American history which set the course for further equality of African-Americans.

From the Paper:

"On November 4, 1861, Union forces seized the coastal Sea Islands between Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia. The military incursion was two-fold in purpose: the Union Navy saw the islands as a strategic deep-water port capable of supporting the naval blockade President Lincoln imposed in April 1861, and the Treasury Department was interested in the profits from the prized Sea Island cotton crops, a variety of long staple cotton English buyers sought for its consistent quality.
"But the seizure also presented a unique opportunity for the newly-freed slaves of the islands, backed by northern abolitionists, to establish a self-sustaining community of cotton farmers and merchants. The Sea Islands were among the first communities in the Civil War to make the transition from slavery to freedom, and northern abolitionists saw the islands as a social experiment which could "demonstrate the fitness of four million African Americans for possible citizenship in the Union were to both win the war and free the slaves.""

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Billington, Ray. "A Social Experiment: The Port Royal Journal of Charlotte L. Forten, 1862-1863" The Journal of Negro History vol. 35, no. 3 (July 1950)
  • Cornish, Dudley. The Sable Arm: Negro Troops in the Union Army 1861-1865 (New York: Norton, 1966)
  • Duberman, Martin. The Antislavery Vanguard: New Essays on the Abolitionists (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965)
  • Foner, Eric. "Politics and Prejudice: The Free Soil Party and the Negro 1849-1852" The Journal of Negro History vol. 50, no.4 (Oct. 1965)
  • _______. "The Meaning of Freedom in the Age of Emancipation" The Journal of American History vol. 81, no.2 (Sept. 1994)

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

The Port Royal Experiment (2009, May 08) Retrieved October 05, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-port-royal-experiment-113770/

MLA Format

"The Port Royal Experiment" 08 May 2009. Web. 05 October. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-port-royal-experiment-113770/>

Comments