The Jazz Age: Representation in New York City in the 1920s Research Paper by TemiA

The Jazz Age: Representation in New York City in the 1920s
An outline of the biographies of key innovators of jazz of the Harlem Renaissance. The paper looks at the lives of Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Ethel Waters, Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, and Fats Waller.
# 153874 | 3,148 words | 14 sources | MLA | 2012 | US


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Description:

The 1920s was a time of innovation, especially in the music world. The Harlem Renaissance ushered in the golden age of jazz music. A number of individuals had a huge impact on jazz music at the time. This paper demonstrates how the backgrounds of the big-time players of the 1920's jazz scene contributed to their success and helped change the course of jazz for a while. The innovators evaluated are Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Ethel Waters, Bessie Smith, Louis Armstrong, and Thomas "Fats" Wright Waller. A look into the backgrounds of these innovators serves to underscore the eclectic value of jazz music.

From the Paper:

"Waters began her singing career as Sweet Mama Stringbean with a small vaudeville company. It was during her time with the company that she became the first woman to sing W.C. Handy's "St. Louis Blues" professionally (Mumford, 2269). After a short stint with the company, Waters makes her way to New York in 1919. Her first job was at a small club, Edmond's Cellar, where she quickly began to gain recognition. She made her first recording, "The New York Glide"/"At the New Jump Steady Ball", on March 21, 1921, making her the fourth black woman to make a record in the 1920s (Bourne, 9). She signed with Black Swan Records soon after began to tour the United States. She made her first appears on Broadway in 1924 as a replacement for Florence Mills in the musical Africana (Mumford, 2269). Her time in the show proved to be the turning point of her career. A song from the show, "Dinah", was her first huge success, gaining her international attention. Waters had the pleasure of recording with both Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman, as well as perform with the Fletcher Henderson orchestra, during the course of her singing career."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • "Black History Month: Duke Ellington." Gale. Cengage Learning Database, n.d. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://www.gale.cengage.com/free_resources/bhm/bio/ellington_d.htm>.
  • Bourne, Stephen. Ethel Waters: Stormy Weather. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow, 2007. Print.
  • Burns, Ken. "JAZZ: A Film By Ken Burns." PBS. PBS, 2000. Web. 16 Oct. 2012. <http://www.pbs.org/jazz/biography/>.
  • Cohen, Harvey G. Duke Ellington's America. Chicago: University of Chicago, 2010. Duke Ellington's America. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. <http://site.ebrary.com/lib/pitt/docDetail.action?docID=10395671>.
  • Collier, James Lincoln. Louis Armstrong: An American Genius. New York: Oxford UP, 1983. EBrary. University of Pittsburgh. Web. 16 Oct. 2012. <http://site.ebrary.com/lib/pitt/docDetail.action?docID=10087137>.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

The Jazz Age: Representation in New York City in the 1920s (2014, May 26) Retrieved November 16, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-jazz-age-representation-in-new-york-city-in-the-1920s-153874/

MLA Format

"The Jazz Age: Representation in New York City in the 1920s" 26 May 2014. Web. 16 November. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-jazz-age-representation-in-new-york-city-in-the-1920s-153874/>

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