The Internet's Impact on Media Communication Research Paper by Nicky

The Internet's Impact on Media Communication
A synopsis of the outcomes of research conducted regarding the effect the Internet has had on the use of other means of media communication.
# 145460 | 2,000 words | 11 sources | APA | 2010 | US


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Description:

This paper discusses the outcomes of research conducted regarding the emergence of the Internet and the effect the Internet has had on other means of media communication. The research is patterned after two communication theories, both of which fall under media studies, which include the uses and gratifications Theory and the Ball-Rokeach and DeFleur's Dependence Theory. In consolidating these theories, it is highly important to connect the media consumers (i.e. University students) and two specific mediums, namely television and Internet. This approach gives attention to the audience member or media user, proposing that the audience member is an active and discriminating user of media rather than a passive one. The paper looks into how an audience member's direct experience with the media affects his/her communication behavior. It also suggests that in knowing what their needs are, audience members will also know how to gratify those needs and as such choose what media will satisfy those needs.

From the Paper:

"But a long-standing debate ensues. With this new technology come new threats that pose certain dangers to individuals and industries. The propagation of mp3 and music-sharing sites in the mid-90's brought the demise of a number of music recording companies. The Internet is being used to peddle prostitutes and spread child prostitution. Newspapers with low circulation are forced to close down and transfer the news to a cheaper medium--The Web. The means, convenient as it may, have been used and then later, abused. With this in mind, will the dawn of YouTube and Peer-to-Peer file sharing networks likewise bring forth the demise of the decades-old television? It is interesting to note the increased popularity of downloading TV shows over the Internet. Likewise, many of us now prefer viewing TV shows in virtual boob tubes (e.g. YouTube) over shows aired in cable TVs. Remarkably, not much is known and studied about University students as television consumers vis-a-vis their being Internet consumers. The general aim of this research, therefore, is to open doors for further research on the subject, which very much lacks local literature content. This study will be patterned after two communication theories, both of which fall under media studies. These are the Uses and Gratifications Theory and Ball-Rokeach and DeFleur's Dependence Theory. In consolidating these theories, it is highly important to connect the media consumers (i.e. University students) and two specific mediums, namely television and Internet. This approach gives attention to the audience member or media user, proposing that the audience member is an active and discriminating user of media rather than a passive one. It looks into how an audience member's direct experience with the media affects his/her communication behavior. It also suggests that in knowing what their needs are, audience members will also know how to gratify those needs and as such choose what media will satisfy those needs. Stemming from the Uses and Gratifications Approach is the Dependency Theory, originally proposed by Sandra Ball-Rokeach and Melvin DeFleur. This theory extends beyond the earlier approach as it suggests that an integral relationship exists among media audiences, media and the larger society (Littlejohn, 2008). As with the uses-and-gratifications theory, this theory proposes that the media user depends on media information in order to meet particular needs and attain certain goals. However, a media user's dependency on each type of media is not on equal ground because, according to Ball-Rokeach and DeFleur, there are two factors which influence a user's dependency on media. Firstly, no one medium can meet a user's needs. Thus a user will depend more on media that satisfy a number of his/her needs rather than on media which only satisfy a few of his/her needs. What information is of greater importance to a user determines the weight of dependence that user gives to particular media. Secondly, social conditions determine media consumption. In times of increasing social change, instability and other significant happenings in society, a user increases his/her dependency on media for information. On the other hand, in times of relative stability dependency on media may decrease."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Allen, D. (2007, August). Top 10 Video Sharing sites. PC World Magazine.
  • Aughton, S. (2005, October 11). P2P activity doubles in two years. PC Pro. Downloaded from http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/78525/p2p-activity-doubles-in-two-years.html
  • CIO Online magazine. (2005, October). June Statistics Reveal Online Video Popularity. Downloaded from http://64.28.79.74/cmo/metrics/viewmetric.cfm?METRIC=866
  • Foulke, N. (2000, December). The history of Napster (a quick and dirty version). The Bi-College News Online. Downloaded from http://www.biconews.com/article/view/3390
  • Grecco, M. (2006, December). The Gurus of Youtube. Time Magazine.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

The Internet's Impact on Media Communication (2010, November 11) Retrieved October 16, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-internet-impact-on-media-communication-145460/

MLA Format

"The Internet's Impact on Media Communication" 11 November 2010. Web. 16 October. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-internet-impact-on-media-communication-145460/>

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