The Catholic Church and Colonial Latin America Research Paper by Nicky

The Catholic Church and Colonial Latin America
Exploration of the historical relationship between the Catholic Church and colonial Latin America.
# 120201 | 1,940 words | 4 sources | APA | 2010 | US
Published on Jun 07, 2010 in History (Religion) , Religion and Theology (Christianity) , History (Latin America)


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Description:

This paper examines the relationship between the Catholic Church and Latin America, which extends back to the earliest history of European Spain's first explorations of South America. The paper explains that the Church was a significant social factor in the lives of the indigenous people, and partnered with the Spanish colonists in exploiting the natural resources of the region, especially the gold. As the paper adds, both the Church and Spain were in need of the economic wealth to be gained, and the Church spearheaded the required socialization process by converting the pagan and monotheistic beliefs of the indigenous people to Catholicism. The paper opines that conversion of the religious identity and beliefs of an indigenous pagan people is essential to creating a basis for a civilized society. The paper concludes that the Church's integral role in the development of Latin America in an economic, political, and social capacity continues to be reflected in Latin America today.

Outline:
Introduction
The Conquest of the Indigenous People
The Catholic Church and Its Economic Link to Latin American Society
Conclusion
Works Cited

From the Paper:

"During the colonial period, the interests of the Church and the European Spanish state cannot easily be separated. It can be said, however, that the Church was a more significant social factor in the lives of the assimilating indigenous people and the Spanish colonists who arrived to colonize the country. There was no mistaking the potential wealth in Latin America, and the letter previously cited from Queen Isabella clearly makes mention of the need for the church and the state to be partners in exploiting the natural resources of the region, especially the gold. Both the Church and Spain would have been in need of the economic wealth that could be gained by exploiting South America, but it required, too, a socialization process, and in that process the Church probably had a more significant role than the Spanish rulers, because the Church converted the pagan beliefs and monotheistic beliefs of the indigenous people to the monotheism of Christianity."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Gill, Anthony. 1998. Rendering Unto Caesar: The Catholic Church and the State in Latin America. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=24682255.
  • Johnson, Lyman L. and Sonya Lipsett-Rivera, eds. 1998. The Faces of Honor: Sex, Shame, and Violence in Colonial Latin America. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=40841372.
  • Lockhart, James, and Stuart B. Schwartz. 1983. A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=99245993.
  • Turner, Frederick C. 1971. Catholicism and Political Development in Latin America. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14749479.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

The Catholic Church and Colonial Latin America (2010, June 07) Retrieved October 28, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-catholic-church-and-colonial-latin-america-120201/

MLA Format

"The Catholic Church and Colonial Latin America" 07 June 2010. Web. 28 October. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-catholic-church-and-colonial-latin-america-120201/>

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