The 2006 Canadian-U.S.A. Softwood Lumber Agreement Research Paper by Quality Writers

The 2006 Canadian-U.S.A. Softwood Lumber Agreement
This paper discusses the Canadian-U.S.A. softwood lumber dispute, the 2006 agreement and the role of the public interest group, the British Columbia Lumber Trade Council.
# 99793 | 3,250 words | 8 sources | APA | 2007 | US


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Description:

This paper explains that, in the Canadian-U.S.A. softwood lumber dispute, Washington objected to the low Canadian lumber prices; whereas, the provinces of Canada saw their role as regulating lumbering so that the mainly Crown lands on which it takes place are maintained ecologically well. The author points out that the 2006 agreement removed the tariff on Canadian softwood, but also established export taxes that will kick into place should the price of lumber drop too low, thus preventing Canadian exporters from "dumping" or selling lumber in the United States at prices less than what goods cost to produce. The paper stresses that Canada like many Third World countries, is a raw material exporter, subjected to prices and rulings made elsewhere and with whole local or even national economies revolving around particular commodities and their related industries.

Table of Contents:
Introduction
Canada's Objectives
The British Columbia Lumber Trade Council
Concluding Notes

From the Paper:

"Critics said that there should be no duty paid by Canadian forestry companies, in the first place, that Americans either wanted to buy lumber that they could not produce in the United States to keep up with demand, or they did not. A Duke University expert on international economic law wrote that the 2005 negotiations that have gone before the present Softwood Lumber Agreement of 2006 involved Washington being made aware of having reacted too quickly to the earlier situation. Some Americans realized that they were on 'thin ice' in terms of the position taken against Canadian producers of lumber, by suddenly charging tariffs, in view of the NAFTA."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Barlow, Maud. (2001). "Global Showdown - The Future of Democracy in the Era of Economic Globalization," in T. Wesson. Ed. Canada and the New World Order - Strategic Briefings for Canadian Enterprise. Toronto: Captus.
  • Beg, F., S. Fallahzadeh Et Al. (2003). "The Canada - U.S. Softwood Lumber Trade Dispute," in D. Jurkowski and G. Easton. Eds. Between Public and Private - Readings and Cases in Canada's Mixed Economy. Toronto: Captus.
  • Brean, D. (2001). "Canada's Economy - Structure and Performance," in Wesson, Canada and the New World Order - Strategic Briefings for Canadian Enterprise.
  • British Columbia Lumber Trade Council. (2006). "About the Lumber Trade Council". Retrieved from www. Bclumbertrade.com in October, 2006.
  • CBC. (2006). "In-depth - Softwood Lumber Dispute." August 23 news.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

The 2006 Canadian-U.S.A. Softwood Lumber Agreement (2007, November 30) Retrieved January 31, 2023, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-2006-canadian-usa-softwood-lumber-agreement-99793/

MLA Format

"The 2006 Canadian-U.S.A. Softwood Lumber Agreement" 30 November 2007. Web. 31 January. 2023. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/the-2006-canadian-usa-softwood-lumber-agreement-99793/>

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