Psychological Testing Research Paper by Quality Writers

Psychological Testing
This paper looks at the reliability and validity of intelligence tests in education.
# 100230 | 1,218 words | 5 sources | APA | 2007 | US


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Description:

In this article, the writer notes that intelligence tests have long been a part of the educational landscape. The writer further points out that many tests have been used to determine intelligence and scholastic aptitude in elementary schools, middle grade schools, and in high schools. The writer discusses that some question does exist over the value of these tests in terms of validity and reliability, particularly in certain populations. This paper is used to briefly examine some of the issues that exist with the use of intelligence testing in the educational field.

Outline:
Literature Review
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Although still uncommon in an educational setting, one trend that must be reviewed is the use of online psychological testing. With computers increasingly present in schools and the availability of online courses later in life, online testing and assessment is a real possibility in the future.
Computerized testing, online or not, is a consideration as the potential inefficiencies of RTI are addressed. More students can be assessed and processed more efficiently, as well as more objectively, when computers are used. However, in the case of students with SLD, this potential trend may not be entirely beneficial. Internet testing has made updating and translating testing materials much easier. It is also easier to record and to compile data from Internet-based testing. Three kinds of testing typically appear on the Internet: tests for layperson use; diagnostic measures, such as the MMPI; and cognitive ability or certification tests."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Bracey, G. W. (2000). Thinking about tests and testing: A short primer in "assessment literacy." Washington, D. C.: American Youth Policy Forum. Retrieved 06 November 2006 from http://www.aypf.org/publications/braceyrep.pdf
  • Frey, M. C., & Detterman, D. K. (2004). Scholastic assessment or g?: The relationship between the scholastic assessment test and general cognitive ability. Psychological Science, 15(6): 373-378 Retrieved 06 November 2006 from http://www.missouri.edu/~aab2b3/Detterman.g.Psychological.Science.pdf
  • Naglieri, J. A., Drasgow, F., Schmit, M., Handler, L. Prifitera, A., Margolis, A., & Velasquez, R. (2004). Psychological testing on the Internet: New problems, old issues. Retrieved 06 November 2006 from http://www.apa.org/science/testing_on_the_internet.pdf
  • National Research Center on Learning Disabilities. (n. d.). Specific learning disabilities: Building consensus for identification and classification. Retrieved 06 November 2006 from http://www.nrcld.org/resources/ldsummit/conclusion.pdf
  • Willis, J. O. & Dumont, R. (2006). Never the twain shall meet: Can response to intervention and cognitive assessment be reconciled?. Psychology in the Schools, 43(8): 901-908.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Psychological Testing (2007, December 19) Retrieved December 09, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/psychological-testing-100230/

MLA Format

"Psychological Testing" 19 December 2007. Web. 09 December. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/psychological-testing-100230/>

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