Organized Labor in US Commercial Aviation Research Paper by Nicky

A research paper on the labor issues in US commercial aviation.
# 145985 | 4,042 words | 12 sources | APA | 2010 | US
Published on Dec 12, 2010 in Business (Industries) , Aviation, Aeronautics (General) , Labor Studies (General)


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Description:

The paper discusses how the Aviation and Transportation Security Act of 2001 aimed to rationalize airline operations by keeping workers productive, flexible, motivated and accountable. The paper describes the subsequent accusations of discrimination, retaliation, unfair actions, mandatory overtime and pressuring not to report labor problems. The paper also addresses emergency levels of staffing in five key areas and labor issues, such as baggage meltdown, bankruptcies and the decrease in the number of mechanists drawn to the industry. The paper discusses how hope for improved conditions hinges on the advantages of technology, cost-cutting, extending the retirement age from 60 to 65 and global cutbacks in oil prices.


Outline:
Abstract
The ATSA
Staffing Emergency in Key Areas
Persisting Labor Issues
Extending Retirement Age
Attracting New Blood
The Advantages of Technology
"Baggage Meltdown"
Cost-Cutting Mostly in Labor
Bankruptcies and Optimism
History of Organized Labor

From the Paper:

"The Aviation and Transportation Security Act of 2001 authorized the head of the Transportation Security Administration to prevent baggage and passenger screening personnel from forming a union (The Colorado Springs Gazette, 2007). The simple objective was to insure that workers should remain "productive, flexible, motivated" and accountable. It viewed national security as far more important than manpower labor. These employees fought hard to unionize but failed repeatedly. They went as far as bringing their situation to the United Nations. The United Nations intervened and ruled that TSA employees should be granted collective bargaining rights. The American Federation of Government Employees, through its president John Gage, accused TSA of subjecting its employees of discrimination, retaliation, unfair actions, mandatory overtime and pressuring them from reporting problems."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Airguide Online (2006). North America. Airline News: Pyramid Media Group, Inc. Retrieved on December 28, 2008 from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOQXQ/is_2006_Oct_2/ai_n27005685?tag=content;col1
  • Air Safety Week (2008). Controllers declare "staffing emergency" in Atlanta, Chicago, New York and Southern California. Access Intelligence, LLC: Gale, CengageLearning. Retrieved on December 28, 2008 from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOUBT/is_2_22/ai_n21194250?tag=content;col1
  • Costello, F.J., chair (2003). Report of the aviation committee. Spring Council Meeting. American Bar Association: Section of Public Utility Communication and Transportation Law. Retrieved on December 28, 2008 from http://www.zsrlaw.com/publications/articles/pdf/newmath2003.pdf
  • Business Writers (2001). Drexel expert available for analysis on the state of aviation labor on 20th anniversary of air traffic control strike. Business Wire: Gale, Cengage Learning. Retrieved on December 28, 2008 from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOEIN/is_2001_July_27/ai_76806173?tag=content;dol1
  • ---------------------- (2003). More "personnel friendly" programs needed to attract more new aviation mechanics. Retrieved on December 28, 2008 from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_mOEIN/is_2003_Oct_27/ai_109257185?tag=content;col1

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Organized Labor in US Commercial Aviation (2010, December 12) Retrieved September 29, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/organized-labor-in-us-commercial-aviation-145985/

MLA Format

"Organized Labor in US Commercial Aviation" 12 December 2010. Web. 29 September. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/organized-labor-in-us-commercial-aviation-145985/>

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