McLuhan, Canada's Asian Heritage and Popular Culture Research Paper by Master Researcher

McLuhan, Canada's Asian Heritage and Popular Culture
Examines the effect of McLuhan's ideas on Canada's Asian heritage and popular culture.
# 39479 | 3,150 words | 8 sources | MLA | 2002 | US
Published on Oct 09, 2003 in Canadian Studies (Immigration Issues) , Asian Studies (General)


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Description:

This paper examines the theories of Marshal McLuhan. The paper focuses on Asian influences on Canadian culture and the manner in which they reflect and illuminate McLuhan's theories. The paper highlights the implications of McLuhan's views on Asian cultural heritage in the electronic age.

From the Paper:

"In a host of different ways its also epitomizes many of aspects of McLuhan's theories, popular culture, and Canada's Asian heritage. A story from Japan that arrived in Toronto via London is a resident of the 'global village'. It is a copy of a printed story of a documentary film being shot about a Japanese adolescent social phenomenon. It has shifted from the typographical culture to the electric age and back again repeatedly and traveled more than halfway around the world.
"At the same time the story is so bizarre that it has a distinct feeling of 'otherness' to it. Frankly it also seems so strange as to be unbelievable at least in the contention that hikiko-mori afflicts millions of teenagers for years. However, those assertions are borne out by other legitimate sources of valid information. The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) website also refers to a million sufferers. It also cites cases of homicidal aggression accompanying the withdrawal from society.
"Nonetheless its presence in a 'miscellany of information' makes it stand out as a peculiar, foreign affliction. There is a notably lower key tone to the article on the BBC website. "Teenage hermits" is as close to tabloid journalism as The Globe and Mail gets. In his "Introduction" to Understanding Media Lewis H Lapham refers to this phenomenon: "The vocabulary is necessarily primitive, reducing argument to gossip and history to the telling of fairy tales.""

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

McLuhan, Canada's Asian Heritage and Popular Culture (2003, October 09) Retrieved September 20, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/mcluhan-canada-asian-heritage-and-popular-culture-39479/

MLA Format

"McLuhan, Canada's Asian Heritage and Popular Culture" 09 October 2003. Web. 20 September. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/mcluhan-canada-asian-heritage-and-popular-culture-39479/>

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