Literacy Instruction for Special Needs Students Research Paper by Jay Writtings LLC

Literacy Instruction for Special Needs Students
An exploration of the instructional techniques for students with autism, hearing impairments, learning disabilities in the area of reading and dyslexia.
# 120342 | 3,427 words | 6 sources | APA | 2010 | US


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Description:

The paper contends that every teacher will most likely encounter autism, hearing impairments, learning disabilities and dyslexia at one point in his or her career, and that is why literacy teachers need to be able to recognize these disabilities, and know how to reach out to these students academically and socially. The paper provides general information on autism, hearing impairments, learning disabilities in the area of reading, and dyslexia. The paper explains the characteristics of these disabilities and the specific instructional techniques teachers can use. The paper argues that education over how to work with students with disabilities that affect language acquisition is vital to the success of the American education system.

Outline:
Introduction
General Overview of Autism
Characteristics of Children with Autism
Literacy Specific Strategies for Autistic Students
General Overview of Hearing Impairments
Characteristics of Children with Hearing Impairments
Literacy Specific Strategies for Students with Hearing Impairments
General Overview of Learning Disabilities in the Area of Reading
Characteristics of Students with Learning Disabilities in the Area of Reading
Literacy Specific Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities in the Area of Reading
General Overview of Dyslexia
Characteristics of Children with Dyslexia
Literacy Specific Strategies for Students with Dyslexia
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Free public education for all is truly an American ideal. American literacy instructors are expected to reach all of their students, regardless of gender, race, developmental level, etc. etc. Almost all students will struggle marginally to moderately with particularly difficult concepts from time to time. However, some students will struggle throughout their academic career due to various disabilities, such as autism, hearing impairments, specific learning disabilities, and dyslexia (just to name a few). These students need the most specific literacy instruction, yet all too often they receive the least. This is due to various reasons. First of all, many teachers are uneducated about the many disabilities that interfere with language acquisition and literacy development. Secondly, many teachers do not feel confident in their abilities to deal with disabled children effectively, so all too often these children are placed in special education classrooms for the majority of the day."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Atkin, L. & MacKinney, D. (2004). Autism, literacy, and libraries: The 3 R's= routine, repetition, and redundancy. Children and Libraries: The Journal of the Association for Library Service to Children, 2, 35-43.
  • Dahle, K. (2003). Services to include young children with autism in the general classroom. Early Childhood Education Journal, 31, 65-70.
  • Heward, W. (2006). Exceptional Children (8th Edition). New Jersey: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.
  • Kalivoda, K. & Others. (1997). Teaching students with hearing impairments. Journal of Developmental Education, 20, 10-16.
  • Wadlington, E. (2000). Effective language arts instruction for students with dyslexia. Preventing School Failure, 44.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Literacy Instruction for Special Needs Students (2010, June 09) Retrieved December 14, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/literacy-instruction-for-special-needs-students-120342/

MLA Format

"Literacy Instruction for Special Needs Students" 09 June 2010. Web. 14 December. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/literacy-instruction-for-special-needs-students-120342/>

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