Fostering the Identity Development of Multiracial Children Research Paper

Fostering the Identity Development of Multiracial Children
This paper looks at the identity development of multiracial individuals versus monoracial individuals, and makes suggestions for fostering positive identity development.
# 153681 | 2,222 words | 12 sources | APA | 2010 | US


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Description:

This research examines the identity development of biracial and multiracial children and discusses the differences in multiracial identity development versus monoracial identity development. For this paper, the term "biracial" refers to an individual with two distinct racial heritages, usually one from each parent, "multiracial" refers to an individual with two or more distinct racial heritages and "monoracial" refers to an individual with only one distinct racial heritage. This paper also explores the unique challenges that multiracial children face, while offering suggestions for fostering the identity development of multiracial children in the public school setting.

Outline:
Issues Affecting Multiracial Youths
Multiracial Identity Development
Poston's Biracial Identity Development Model
Fostering a Positive Identity
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Race is no longer a black and white issue. Since the 1967 repeal of miscegenation laws that prohibited racial mixing, the number of interracial marriages in the United States has dramatically increased (Shih & Sanchez, 2005). Until recently, there was no true picture of the number of biracial and multiracial individuals in the country. On the 2000 Census, individuals were allowed, for the first time, to mark more than one racial or ethnic category. On previous Census reports, individuals had to choose only one of their racial or ethnic components (Aldarondo, 2001). According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2000), 2.4% of the U.S. population (6,826,228 people) acknowledges belonging to 2 or more races, and 42% of them, about 2.8 million people, are under the age of 18. This is an enormous increase from 1970 when the estimated multiracial population was around 500,000. This growing "trend" will likely continue, as the biracial population is growing faster than any other cultural group (Aldarondo, 2001).
"For the past several years, biracial and multiracial individuals have been expected to identify themselves as their minority component or choose to be an "other". For many who identify themselves as biracial or multiracial, however, this means denying the whole of their identity."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Aldarondo, F. (2001). Racial and ethnic identity models and their applications: Counseling biracial individuals. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 23, 238-255. Retrieved January 29, 2008, from ProQuest database.
  • Harris, H. L. (2002). School counselors' perceptions of biracial children: A pilot study. Professional School Counseling, 6, 120-128. Retrieved January 29, 2008, from ProQuest database.
  • Ingram, P. D. (2000). Valuing a growing population: Biracial youth. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 92, 10-11. Retrieved January 29, 2008, from ProQuest database.
  • Jeffreys, M. R., & Zoucha, R. (2001). The invisible culture of the multiracial, multiethical individual: A transcultural imperative. Journal of Cultural Diversity, 8(3), 79-84. Retrieved January 29, 2008, from ProQuest database.
  • McFadden, J. (2001). Intercultural marriage and family: Beyond the racial divide. Family Journal, 9, 39-42. Retrieved January 29, 2008, from ProQuest database.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Fostering the Identity Development of Multiracial Children (2013, October 03) Retrieved August 22, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/fostering-the-identity-development-of-multiracial-children-153681/

MLA Format

"Fostering the Identity Development of Multiracial Children" 03 October 2013. Web. 22 August. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/fostering-the-identity-development-of-multiracial-children-153681/>

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