Effects of Social Media on News Consumption Research Paper by scribbler

A research study to determine where a majority of collegiate students are getting their information regarding current events.
# 152292 | 6,427 words | 15 sources | APA | 2013 | US


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Description:

This paper assesses a relatively small sample of individuals representing a normative sample of news consumers in an effort to determine where the average news consumer is getting most of their news, their year of study within a university setting, and the amount of time they devote to several popular social networking sites. The paper provides a literature review and outlines the research questions, hypotheses, method and results. The paper also addresses the limitations of this study and includes surveys and a questionnaire as appendices to the paper.

Outline:
Introduction
Literature Review
Statement of the Research Question & Hypothesis
Method
Results
Discussion

From the Paper:

"Media, its medium, form, content, and context shapes the public's understanding of current events. Recently though there has been a shift from more traditional print media to digital media, print media in fact only actively being sought en masse in instances of nationally and globally significant events and then more as commemorative memorabilia than an actual source of information (Alboher, 2008). Events in recent history such as 9/11 have helped frame digital media as the definitive news source for the 21st century (Bouvier, 2005). With this new face of media, there are new concerns regarding the overall shaping influence of less reputable or carefully regulated news sources such as popular social networking sites which are responsible for the dissemination of huge amounts of questionably accurate information. With the public evermore deluged with highly compressed information from around the globe continuously it is difficult to determine what if any will be the overall and long term effects of such forms of news consumption on the face of society even one year from now.
"Unfortunately, few studies exist which assess the relative impact and influence of these various new media sources resulting in virtually no knowledge regarding the relative value of a "tweet" as opposed to a segment on the evening news. It is the purpose of this study to assess a relatively small sample of individuals representing a normative sample of news consumers in an effort to determine where the average news consumer is getting most of their news, their year of study within a university setting, and the amount of time they devoted to several popular social networking sites."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Weitzer, R., & Kubrin, C. (2004). Breaking news: How local TV news and real- world conditions affect fear of crime. Justice Quarterly, 21, 497- 520.
  • Leung, L., & Wei, R. (1999). Seeking news via the pager: An expectancy- value study. Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 43, 299- 315.
  • Newton, K.(1999). Mass media effects: Mobilization or media malaise? British Journal of Political Science, 29, 577- 599.
  • Tsfati, Y. (2003). Does audience skepticism of the media matter in agenda setting? Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 47, 157- 176.
  • Watson, W. (2005). Cognitive effects of breaking news: Establishing a media frame to test audience primes. Doctoral Dissertation, Kent State University, 1- 157.

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Effects of Social Media on News Consumption (2013, January 23) Retrieved September 19, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/effects-of-social-media-on-news-consumption-152292/

MLA Format

"Effects of Social Media on News Consumption" 23 January 2013. Web. 19 September. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/effects-of-social-media-on-news-consumption-152292/>

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