Decision-Making Scenario: Applecraft High School Research Paper by scribbler

Decision-Making Scenario: Applecraft High School
An application of the seven-step decision-making model as applied to Applecraft High School.
# 152778 | 1,251 words | 2 sources | APA | 2013 | US
Published on Apr 29, 2013 in Business (Management) , Gender and Sexuality (Homosexuality) , Education (General)


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Description:

This paper discusses how the seven-step decision-making model identifies seven distinct steps in an ideal decision-making process: identifying the decision to be made; assessing the decision-maker's bias; identifying his or her options; gathering information about different alternatives; evaluating options and the pros and cons of the alternatives; selecting the best option, and then implementing it through an action plan. In particular, the paper attempts to apply the theory to the celebration of gay history month at Applecraft High School. The paper looks at how a decision must be made as to whether to allow the celebrations to occur and whether banning a celebration of gay history month could send a message to the student body that it was not okay to be gay and that discriminating against gays was acceptable.

From the Paper:

"The seven-step model is also slightly more flexible than rational decision-making models such as the decision matrix, Pugh matrix, decision grid, selection matrix, and criteria rating form that also force the decision-maker to adopt a step-by-step process in a fairly systematic fashion (Seven step decision model, 2010, Decision-making confidence). Unlike the seven-step model, rational decision-making schemas tend to presume there is only one 'correct' decision. In rational models, there is a scoring formula, and the decision that is the most 'correct' is deemed to be the winner. In the seven-step model, while it demands the decision-maker defines the situation and weighs the pros and cons of solutions, there is some presumption that blending the different options or even finding a new alternative is possible, as the options are not segmented into a grid or matrix (Rational decision model, 2010, Decision-making confidence). The seven-step model also forces the decision-maker to consider his or her biases, while the rational model presumes that the actor will always come to the best and most rational decision if the reasoning process is executed correctly, and all failures to do so are the result of incomplete evidence, never bias on the part of the decider. "

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Rational decision model. (2010). Decision-Making Confidence. Retrieved September 3, 2010 at http://www.decision-making-confidence.com/rational-decision-making-models.html
  • Seven-step decision model. (2010). Decision-Making Confidence. Retrieved September 3, 2010 at http://www.decision-making-confidence.com/7-step-decision-making-model.html

Cite this Research Paper:

APA Format

Decision-Making Scenario: Applecraft High School (2013, April 29) Retrieved August 18, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/research-paper/decision-making-scenario-applecraft-high-school-152778/

MLA Format

"Decision-Making Scenario: Applecraft High School" 29 April 2013. Web. 18 August. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/research-paper/decision-making-scenario-applecraft-high-school-152778/>

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