Truth and Reality in British Poetry Poem Review

Truth and Reality in British Poetry
An exploration of the concepts of truth and reality in the poems "The Lie," by Sir Walter Ralegh, "The Wanderer," an anonymous writing from the Anglo-Saxon period and "Good Friday, 1613, Riding Westward," by John Donne .
# 149451 | 1,217 words | 3 sources | MLA | 2011 | US
Published on Dec 18, 2011 in Literature (Poetry) , English (Analysis)


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Description:

This paper discusses how many early English works of literature incorporate themes of truth and reality, using techniques such as dream-visions, introducing theological questions like, "Whose God is God?", and exaggerating the portrayal of characters - especially Christ - to illustrate a certain meaning or theme. In particular, the paper looks at how it can be deduced from studying three non-related works from different periods of time - "The Lie," by Sir Walter Ralegh in the Tudor period, "The Wanderer," an anonymous writing from the Anglo-Saxon period, and "Good Friday, 1613, Riding Westward," by John Donne in the Stuart period - that early English writers were as consumed with the search for truth as writers are today.

From the Paper:

""Good Friday, 1613, Riding Westward," written by John Donne in the Stuart period, follows the same pattern. In this poem, Donne is reminded of the life and death of Christ, and he begins to question whether he can behold the sight of God's death: the crucifixion of Christ. Later, disgusted with himself, Donne begs God to punish him as he himself was punished. This presents in one poem two polar opposite realities - one in which the narrator cannot bear witness to his Lord's suffering and another in which he wishes to suffer that agony himself as penance. Donne turns away from his Lord, suggesting abandonment, because he cannot bear the weight of the pain his Lord had to suffer. In doing so, Donne is admitting his own sinfulness. Yet, Donne's conclusion reads similar to the conclusions of "The Lie" and "The Wanderer." "

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Donne, John. "Good Friday, 1613, Riding Westward." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: Norton, 2006. 1299.
  • Ralegh, Walter. "The Lie." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: Norton, 2006. 919.
  • "The Wanderer." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: Norton, 2006. 113.

Cite this Poem Review:

APA Format

Truth and Reality in British Poetry (2011, December 18) Retrieved January 31, 2023, from https://www.academon.com/poem-review/truth-and-reality-in-british-poetry-149451/

MLA Format

"Truth and Reality in British Poetry" 18 December 2011. Web. 31 January. 2023. <https://www.academon.com/poem-review/truth-and-reality-in-british-poetry-149451/>

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