Human Handicaps in "The Cripples" Poem Review by scribbler

Human Handicaps in "The Cripples"
A review and analysis of the poem, "The Cripples," by A. M. Klein.
# 152447 | 809 words | 1 source | MLA | 2013 | US
Published on Feb 13, 2013 in Literature (Poetry) , Religion and Theology (General)


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Description:

This paper analyzes how in his poem, "The Cripples," A. M. Klein looks at St Joseph Oratory's visitors and himself as separate entities representing different aspects of life. The paper discusses how each aspect is significant to the poet as he attempts to wrestle with his emotions regarding what the oratory represents; the paper also shows how the poem offers both a personal view of the poet, as well as a broader view of humankind. Furthermore, the paper explains how the poem is a tale of two kinds of people; one kind are the most lucky in that they have hope and faith, and the other kind of person is the poet, who is lacking any kind of hope and faith, and is painfully aware of his loss and lack.

From the Paper:

"The steps leading up to the building appear to be an ominous challenge and, just by looking at them, I would think there would need to be something remarkably beautiful or worthwhile to climb those steps. Since a healing saint inspired the oratory, we can assume that many of the visitors are seeking healing, which gives the place a mysterious quality. Knowing a man noted for his healing powers is behind the structure gives it a sense of awe. To add to this, the body of Andre is housed in the structure, lending to the belief of the saint's healing powers. The building is no doubt stunning and beautiful. Even without any knowledge of its history, one knows, when looking at it, that one is looking at a masterpiece of architecture. Knowing the history only illuminates the building's mystic quality and allure.
"In his poem, "The Cripples," A. M. Klein looks at the oratory's visitors and himself as separate entities representing different aspects of life. Each aspect, of course, its significant to the poet as he attempts to wrestle his emotions regarding what the oratory represents. The poet realizes how the building itself is "rich" (4) and "plumped with blessing" (4) and how Andre's days were "rounded" (6) and filled "honeyed to honeycomb" (6). The poet sounds slightly cynical in regard to the saint who possessed powers to heal. However, walking up to that plump dome, the poet sees the withered heads of the palsied and lame walking up the 99 steps and watches them raise the "look, their hope, and the idee fixe of their main/ knowing surgery's in the heart" (10-1)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Klein, A. M. "The Cripples." Textbook. City Published: Publisher. Year Published.

Cite this Poem Review:

APA Format

Human Handicaps in "The Cripples" (2013, February 13) Retrieved September 19, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/poem-review/human-handicaps-in-the-cripples-152447/

MLA Format

"Human Handicaps in "The Cripples"" 13 February 2013. Web. 19 September. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/poem-review/human-handicaps-in-the-cripples-152447/>

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