Theodore Morris' Paintings and Florida's Indigenous Populations Persuasive Essay by scribbler

Theodore Morris' Paintings and Florida's Indigenous Populations
A brief discussion on how Theodore Morris' oil paintings shed light on Florida's indigenous populations.
# 152950 | 810 words | 5 sources | MLA | 2013 | US
Published on May 01, 2013 in Art (Painting) , Archaeology (General)


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Description:

The paper examines Theodore Morris' oil paintings and relates that they draw visual imagery from the 16th and 17th century ethnographic engravings of Theodore de Bry and Jacques Le Moyne, while also incorporating a more extensive knowledge of the actual tools, implements, and artifacts used by the native residents of Florida. The paper points out that not all of the artifacts shown in Morris' paintings would have survived the ravages of time and the elements, and so these paintings offer a valuable visual window into the culture, worldview, and lifestyle of Florida's indigenous populations. Specifically, the paper looks at Morris' "Scrub Jay,""The Potter" and "Spirit Woman" paintings, and explains how each of the elements depicted in the paintings convey meaningful data to the anthropologist and archaeologist.

From the Paper:

"The 16th and 17th century ethnographic engravings of Theodore de Bry and Jacques Le Moyne reveal the European perception of the indigenous people of Florida. Their depictions are at once realistic and symbolic. Some portray objective images like a bird's eye-view of a Timucuan village compound; whereas others depict ritual offerings without an appropriate cultural context. Theodore Morris's oil paintings draw visual imagery from the engravings while also incorporating a more extensive knowledge of the actual tools, implements, and artifacts used by the native residents of Florida. Not all of the artifacts shown in Morris's paintings would have survived the ravages of time and the elements. Indeed, Florida's humidity causes a more rapid deterioration of objects made of wood and other organic materials. Dyes would have faded. Tattoos, an important cultural artifact, naturally perish with the deceased. Except for pottery, shells, and beads, few of the objects depicted by Morris would have survived for archaeologists. Morris's paintings therefore offer a valuable visual window into the culture, worldview, and lifestyle of Florida's indigenous populations.
"In Morris's "Scrub Jay," the subject gazes up at the sky while the titular bird rests comfortably on her right pointer finger. Perched as if on a tree branch, the bird perceives the woman as being a part of nature--inseparable from the surrounding trees and shrubs. This interconnectedness between the human and natural worlds cannot be captured in any physical artifact."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Balme, Jane and Paterson, Alistair. Archaeology in practice: a student guide to archaeological analyses. Wiley-Blackwell, 2006.
  • "Drawings by Jacques le Moyne 1564." Retrieved 16 Nov 2010 from http://www.floridalivinghistory.com/timucuan/lemoyne/
  • Kelly, Robert L, and Thomas, David Hurst. Archaeology. Cengage Learning, 2009.
  • "Le Moyne Gallery." Exploring Florida: A Social Studies Resource for Students and Teachers. Produced by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology, Retrieved 16 Nov 2010 from http://fcit.usf.edu/florida/photos/native/lemoyne/lemoyne8/lemoy8.htm
  • Morris, Theodore. "Paintings." Retrieved 16 Nov 2010 from http://www.floridalosttribes.com/tmpaintings.htm

Cite this Persuasive Essay:

APA Format

Theodore Morris' Paintings and Florida's Indigenous Populations (2013, May 01) Retrieved February 27, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/persuasive-essay/theodore-morris-paintings-and-florida-indigenous-populations-152950/

MLA Format

"Theodore Morris' Paintings and Florida's Indigenous Populations" 01 May 2013. Web. 27 February. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/persuasive-essay/theodore-morris-paintings-and-florida-indigenous-populations-152950/>

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