Can Canada be Considered a Democracy? Persuasive Essay by scribbler

Can Canada be Considered a Democracy?
A critical look at participatory democracy, economic inequality and the condition of democracy in Canada.
# 153314 | 1,879 words | 9 sources | APA | 2013 | US


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Description:

The paper examines the issue of democracy in Canada from the perspectives of both participatory and direct democracy theories and discusses the link between economic inequality and democracy. The paper explains that democracy in theory helps to reduce economic and social inequalities in the society, while extreme inequality undermines democracy. The paper therefore draws the conclusion that Canada, which is rife with income inequality, cannot be considered a truly democratic country.

Outline:
Introduction
Theoretical Background
Literature Review
Conclusion

From the Paper:

"Some theoretical grounding is necessary to analyze this topic. This paper will primarily analyze the issue from the perspectives of participatory democracy and direct democracy theories. Participatory democratic theory implies that there must be "maximum participation of citizens in their self-governance, especially in sectors of society beyond those that are traditionally understood to be political (for example, the household and workplace)" (Hilmer, 2010, p. 43). One of the founders of this theory was Arnold S. Kaufman who, influenced by John Dewey and C. Wright Mills, called for "participatory politics." The theory was quite popular in the 1960s and '70s but then its popularity began to dwindle. North American political scientists do not take this theory seriously any longer, but a government based on this theory has worked in Switzerland and is gaining popularity in Latin American countries such as Brazil (Hilmer, 2010, p. 45).
"Participatory democratic theory has been criticized by those who advocate representative democracy as a viable alternative. For example, political theorist Mark E. Warren argued that the participatory democratic theory was "beset by a fuzzy utopianism" and could not appreciate the "complexity, size, and scale of advanced industrial societies." He also argued that the participatory democratic vision was like a "romantic dogma" and that people would find too cumbersome to actively participate in each and every public affair (Hilmer, 2010, p. 49)."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Bartels, L.M. (2005) Economic Inequality and Political Representation. Unpublished paper. Retrieved on March 27, 2001, from http://www.princeton.edu/~bartels/economic.pdf
  • Bollen, K. A., & Jackman, R. W. (1985). POLITICAL DEMOCRACY AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF INCOMES. American Sociological Review, 50(4), 438-457. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.
  • Burkhart, R. E. (2007). Democracy, Capitalism, and Income Inequality: Seeking Causal Directions. Comparative Sociology, 6(4), 481-507.
  • Hilmer, J. D. (2010). The State of Participatory Democratic Theory. New Political Science, 32(1), 43-63.
  • LIPSET, S. (1959). SOME SOCIAL REQUISITES OF DEMOCRACY; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND POLITICAL LEGITIMACY. American Political Science Review, 69. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.

Cite this Persuasive Essay:

APA Format

Can Canada be Considered a Democracy? (2013, May 21) Retrieved July 27, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/persuasive-essay/can-canada-be-considered-a-democracy-153314/

MLA Format

"Can Canada be Considered a Democracy?" 21 May 2013. Web. 27 July. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/persuasive-essay/can-canada-be-considered-a-democracy-153314/>

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