Marketing Organic Chocolate Bars Marketing Plan by Nicky

Marketing Organic Chocolate Bars
A marketing plan for the Everyday line of organic chocolate candy bars.
# 149227 | 1,432 words | 8 sources | APA | 2011 | US
Published on Nov 30, 2011 in Business (Marketing) , Business (Business Plans)


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Description:

The paper looks at Everyday's mission and its message that this new organic chocolate product line is healthy, tastes just like regular candy and is now affordable. The paper details Everyday's focus on product, price, place and promotion and how the company will use advertising, direct marketing, sales promotion, publicity/public relations and personal selling. The paper also points out how Everyday will track the success of its advertising.

From the Paper:

"Direct marketing sends messages directly to consumers, without the use of intervening media. Examples include direct mail, e-mail, and telemarketing. It delivers a specific "call-to-action" with responses that can be easily measured. While direct mail can quickly fall into the junk mail bin and accurate lists may be difficult to obtain, businesses can take steps to make sure their direct mail is personally relevant to the consumer and can test their approaches to determine if they will get their expected results without spending a lot of money (Liesse, 2009). Further, mail and e-mail make couponing and sampling very easy to execute.
"Sales promotion is a marketing incentive applied for a predetermined, limited period of time in order to stimulate trial or increase consumer demand. Although costly, a promotion is a way to offer a price reduction without having the complexity of going directly through the retailer. According to Bhasin, Dickinson, Hauri and Robinson (1989), promotions that impart a selling message along with the deal and that build image are the most successful.
"Public relations/publicity is the careful management of communication between the company and the general public. "The key is to make the product visible to consumers in ways they will seek more information about it." (Elliott, 2004). However, publicity is difficult to control and can turn negative if credibility is not achieved."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Beirne, M. (2006, June 5). News analysis: Snickers sales drop may prove tough nut for Mars. Brandweek. Retrieved from http://www.allbusiness.com/marketing-advertising/branding-brand-development/4671563-1.html
  • Bhasin, A., Dickinson, R., Hauri, C.G., and Robinson, W.A. (1989). Promotion investments that keep paying off. Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol/is. 6/1 (31-36).
  • Elliott, S. (2004, May 10). Pursuing marketing buzz. The New York Times. p. 8.
  • Knudson, W.A. (2007, April) The organic food market. Retrieved from http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache:GahEBVSBnWcJ:www.aec.msu.edu/Product/documents/Working/organicfood1.pdf+%22health+food%22+market+growth&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=7&gl=us
  • Liesse, J. (2009, March 30). When times are hard, mail works. Advertising Age, vol./is. 80/11 (14-14).

Cite this Marketing Plan:

APA Format

Marketing Organic Chocolate Bars (2011, November 30) Retrieved May 23, 2022, from https://www.academon.com/marketing-plan/marketing-organic-chocolate-bars-149227/

MLA Format

"Marketing Organic Chocolate Bars" 30 November 2011. Web. 23 May. 2022. <https://www.academon.com/marketing-plan/marketing-organic-chocolate-bars-149227/>

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