The Use of Space in "The Bicycle Thief" and "The Conformist" Film Review by scribbler

The Use of Space in "The Bicycle Thief" and "The Conformist"
Compares aspects of Vittorio De Sica's film "The Bicycle Thief" and Bernardo Bertollucci's film "The Conformist."
# 152000 | 902 words | 1 source | APA | 2012 | US


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Description:

This paper analyzes the use and meaning of space in two films about Italy recovering from the devastation of World War II. The first film, Vittorio De Sica's 1948 film "The Bicycle Thief", is described as illustrating how widespread poverty directly alters and degrades the individual human experience. Next, "The Bicycle Thief" is compared to Bernardo Bertollucci's "The Conformist" which was released in 1970. According to the paper, "The Conformist" offers a compelling examination of fascism set to the same backdrop of Italian despair. Finally, the paper notes how use of the backdrop of Italian political history creates the cinematic space within which their characters acted. Additionally, the paper compares the protagonists in each film, their struggles, and the overall plots.

From the Paper:

"Based on a novel composed in roughly the same post-WWII era, Bernardo Bertollucci's The Conformist would not be released until 1970. But here, in the midst of another wave of European student revolt on behalf of socialist values, Bertolucci would offer a compelling examination of fascism set to the same backdrop of Italian despair. With the benefit of the grainy and overexposed textures distinct to 1970s cinematic convention and with a heavy dose of explicit and taboo sexuality, The Conformist is the deeply ironic title for a film which uses striking visual surrealism to deconstruct individual identity as a function of social convention.
"Perhaps the feature which most associates the films crafted by De Sica and Bertolucci is their shared use of the backdrop of Italian political history to create the cinematic space within which their characters acted. This is a property which becomes immediately apparent in The Bicycle Thief. Indeed, the opening scene of the film provides a funneling effect, moving from a demonstration of the strain on the population to a personalization of the coming narrative. A crowd of men stands anxiously awaiting news that any of them might be selected for the next of the scarcely available jobs to be had in the post-war Roman slum."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Von Busack, Richard. (Dec. 1998). Return of the 'Thief.' Metroactive Movies. Online at http://www.metroactive.com/papers/metro/12.10.98/bicyclethief 9849.html

Cite this Film Review:

APA Format

The Use of Space in "The Bicycle Thief" and "The Conformist" (2012, November 09) Retrieved January 17, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/film-review/the-use-of-space-in-the-bicycle-thief-and-the-conformist-152000/

MLA Format

"The Use of Space in "The Bicycle Thief" and "The Conformist"" 09 November 2012. Web. 17 January. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/film-review/the-use-of-space-in-the-bicycle-thief-and-the-conformist-152000/>

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