Yellow Fever Essay by Quality Writers

Yellow Fever
This paper discuses the the impact of the 1853 Yellow Fever epidemic upon the community of Biloxi, Mississippi.
# 99192 | 1,465 words | 8 sources | MLA | 2007 | US


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Description:

This paper explains that, in 1853, yellow fever, which today mostly is under control, had been a part of the American landscape for dozens of generations and had shaped life in the Deep South during the nineteenth century. The author points out that the medical community did not know that yellow fever was caused by mosquitoes, which meant that a disproportionate amount of time and resources were devoted to quarantining the sick and to fumigating the mail. The paper relates that the 1853 tragic epidemic forced civic leaders in Mississippian communities to improve vastly their sanitation and water supply systems, as well as increase medical research into the cause of yellow fever and create shelters and "half-way" homes for the orphans.

From the Paper:

"Ironically enough, at the same time as nineteenth century America found itself being buffeted by one yellow fever attack after another, Biloxi, Mississippi became a popular resort destination for wealthy outsiders seeking to escape that city's oppressive summer heat and frequent yellow fever outbreaks. Furthermore, the middle nineteenth century - at almost the precise time as Biloxi was to be wracked by the 1853 crisis - also saw an ever-growing number of outsiders and tourists flocking to the fledgling city so as to be near the ostensible healing powers of its local waters."

Sample of Sources Used:

  • Caplinger, Christopher. "Yellow Fever Epidemics". The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. 2002. Tennessee Historical Society. 3 Aug. 2006 <http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=Y002>.
  • "Many Flags Have Flown over Biloxi". Biloxi: History. Thompson Gale. 3 Aug. 2006 <http://www.city-data.com/us-cities/The-South/Biloxi-History.html>.
  • Marton, Tanya. "Yellow Fever and Dr. Reed". The Fight for Life: Medical Innovation during War. Tanya Marton. 3 Aug. 2006 <http://www.mcatmaster.com/medicine&war/yellowfever.htm>.
  • Northway, Wally. "Mississippi Childrens' Home Society". Mississsippi Business Journal, 21.48 (29 Nov. 1999): 16.
  • Pain, Stephanie. "The Yellowjack Express". New Scientist 168.2260 (14 Oct. 2000): 48-49.

Cite this Essay:

APA Format

Yellow Fever (2007, October 31) Retrieved May 08, 2021, from https://www.academon.com/essay/yellow-fever-99192/

MLA Format

"Yellow Fever" 31 October 2007. Web. 08 May. 2021. <https://www.academon.com/essay/yellow-fever-99192/>

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