Utilitarianism Essay by The Research Group

Utilitarianism
Examines John Stuart Mill's views on moral principles based on the greatest happiness of the greatest number.
# 14698 | 675 words | 1 source | 1999 | US


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Description:

"In this chapter, "Of the Ultimate Sanction of the Principle of Utility," John Stuart Mill discusses the philosophical system of Utilitarianism. Here he is arguing that the system is at least as easy to believe in, and as effective a moral tool, in governing one's behavior as any other moral or ethical system that a person might hold to.

From the Paper:

"In this chapter, "Of the Ultimate Sanction of the Principle of Utility," John Stuart Mill discusses the philosophical system of Utilitarianism. Here he is arguing that the system is at least as easy to believe in, and as effective a moral tool, in governing one's behavior as any other moral or ethical system that a person might hold to. This argument sounds a little odd to the modern reader, who is most likely inclined to believe in what Mill is so painfully arguing without much thinking about it. Raised as most Westerners have been in a world in which people of good will come together from varying religious and ethical systems on a daily basis, it is hard for us to imagine a world in which there was a single (or even a very small number) of moral orthodoxies. And yet, of course, this is precisely the kind of world in which Mill lived when he wrote Utilitarianism ..."

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