Treatment of Death in "Charlotte's Web" Essay by Kimberly

Treatment of Death in "Charlotte's Web"
A discussion of the treatment of death in E. B. White's book "Charlotte's Web".
# 154064 | 1,521 words | 1 source | 2014 | US
Published on Nov 06, 2014 in English (Narrative) , English (Analysis) , English (General)


$19.95 Buy and instantly download this paper now

Description:

Charlotte's Web, a children's novel by E. B. White, tells the enchanting tale of barnyard friendship and the circle of life. Wilbur, the pig, is born the runt of the litter in the spring and is of no use to the farmer, Mr. Arable. He sets out to "do away with" the pig until his eight-year old daughter, Fern, convinces him to spare his life. The subject of death is not hidden from the children in the story, nor could it be while they live on a farm, where it is a daily part of life. Although the book addresses the adult themes of loss and the inevitability of death, it also celebrates life, love and friendship.

From the Paper:

"Charlotte's Web, a children's novel by EB White, tells the enchanting tale of barnyard friendship and the circle of life. "Where's Papa going with that ax?" (1). The novel begins with excitement in the middle of the action. Wilbur, the pig, is born the runt of the litter in the spring and is of no use to the farmer, Mr. Arable. He sets out to "do away with" the pig until his eight-year old daughter, Fern, convinces him to spare his life. The subject of death is not hidden from the children in the story, nor could it be while they live on a farm, where it is a daily part of life. Although the book addresses the adult themes of loss and the inevitability of death, it also celebrates life, love and friendship.
"When Fern learns what her father is planning to do, she races outside to stop him. Mr. Arable intends to spare the pig from suffering, as it "would probably die anyway" (1), but the little girl sees this as "a matter of life and death" (2). Fern cries, "But it's unfair... The pig couldn't help being born small, could it? If I had been very small at birth, would you have killed me?" Her father answers, "Certainly not... But this is different." Fern replies, "I see no difference... This is the most terrible case of injustice I ever heard of" (3). Although death is a common part of life on a farm, Fern feels that this case is different. The pig didn't do anything to deserve an early death. His only crime was having the misfortune of being born the runt. She wants to save the life of this innocent creature and watch it grow up. When Fern returns to the house victorious, it smells of, among other things, bacon. This is E.B. White's subtle way of alluding to the fact that pigs on farms aren't raised as pets. They are destined to be somebody's dinner, or in this case, breakfast."

Cite this Essay:

APA Format

Treatment of Death in "Charlotte's Web" (2014, November 06) Retrieved December 14, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/essay/treatment-of-death-in-charlotte-web-154064/

MLA Format

"Treatment of Death in "Charlotte's Web"" 06 November 2014. Web. 14 December. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/essay/treatment-of-death-in-charlotte-web-154064/>

Comments