To Know and to Believe: The Epistemology of Michel de Montaigne Essay

To Know and to Believe: The Epistemology of Michel de Montaigne
This paper examines Montaigne's theory of knowledge as defined in "An Apology" for Raymond Sebond and in the "Essays".
# 4411 | 1,680 words | 4 sources | 2000 | US
Published on Feb 12, 2003 in Literature (French)


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Description:

This paper examines the epistemological thought of Michel de Montaigne. Drawing heavily on his "An Apology for Raymond Sebond", and less so on the essays, the paper is an attempt to synthesize the classical and religious influences in Montaigne?s theory of knowledge. It traces Montaigne?s argument in a clear, logical fashion, describing his view of man?s odyssey to perfection. Special attention is placed on the influence of Plato?s thought on Montaigne, as well as the religious context in which the "Apology" was written.

From the paper:

"This paper examines the epistemological thought of Michel de Montaigne. Drawing heavily on his An Apology for Raymond Sebond, and less so on the Essays, the paper is an attempt to synthesize the classical and religious influences in Montaigne?s theory of knowledge. It traces Montaigne?s argument in a clear, logical fashion, describing his view of man?s odyssey to perfection. Special attention is placed on the influence of Plato?s thought on Montaigne, as well as the religious context in which the Apology was written."

From the Paper:

"Unfortunately, reason alone is not enough in mankind's quest for knowledge of himself, God, and the ways of salvation. The fact that man depends on God to provide the faculty of reason, which is imperfect, certainly means that he cannot comprehend the perfect God Who provides it. And doubt about the essence of God necessarily implies doubt in man's knowledge of all inferior existence; this is the essence of Montaigne's skepticism. An understanding of the limits of reason, therefore, causes man to enter the second phase of his path towards true knowledge" a reevaluation of his worldly experience. Immersed in his pride, man views his experience as representing truth. In the context of limited reason, however, man's experience merely provides knowledge of transient being "not what he is, but what he is becoming. Montaigne recognizes "that the characteristic property of the creature is impermanence."

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APA Format

To Know and to Believe: The Epistemology of Michel de Montaigne (2003, February 12) Retrieved June 25, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/essay/to-know-and-to-believe-the-epistemology-of-michel-de-montaigne-4411/

MLA Format

"To Know and to Believe: The Epistemology of Michel de Montaigne" 12 February 2003. Web. 25 June. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/essay/to-know-and-to-believe-the-epistemology-of-michel-de-montaigne-4411/>

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