The Olympic Games Essay by Neatwriter

The Olympic Games
An overview of the history of the Olympic Games from their origins in Ancient Greece.
# 62919 | 1,619 words | 9 sources | MLA | 2005 | US
Published on Dec 15, 2005 in Sport (Olympics) , Sport (Medicine and Drugs)


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Description:

This paper traces the history of the Olympic Games from the first record of the games at Olympia in 776 BC. It looks at how the first Olympic Games were not the games of today that represent a worldwide competition between the best athletes of the world. The ancient Olympic Games were dedicated to the Gods and only involved Greek athletes. It also examines the beginnings of the modern Olympic Games from their inception in France in 1900 and how they have over the years endeared political influences, performance enhancing drugs and the bribery of the IOC (International Olympic Committee).

From the Paper:

"The ancient Greek Olympics were held every four years from 776 BC for the next 12 centuries. The ancient games lasted until 393 AD. The Romans had won the wars against the Greeks in 146 BC and were now in control of the Olympics. The games lasted until 393 AD, when the Roman Emperor Theodosius I (Rolfe 14) decided to end the games. The Emperor was incensed that the people were worshipping the gods and he wanted them to worship him. The Romans ruined the Olympic stadium and what was left was destroyed by natural events, such as floods and earthquakes. This was the end of the ancient Greek Olympic games. It would be centuries before the games would be reinstated and they would be different from the ancient games, but the influence of the ancient Greeks would forever be evident in the competitions."

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APA Format

The Olympic Games (2005, December 15) Retrieved February 23, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/essay/the-olympic-games-62919/

MLA Format

"The Olympic Games" 15 December 2005. Web. 23 February. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/essay/the-olympic-games-62919/>

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