Organismic Theory Essay by The Research Group

Organismic Theory
Discusses the theories which hold that the interaction between a person and the environment affects motivation. Self-determination, competence and relatedness are the specific needs on which this interaction occurs.
# 12404 | 900 words | 1 source | 1997 | US
Published on Jun 11, 2003 in Psychology (Motivation Studies)


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From the Paper:

"Organismic theories hold that the interaction between a person and the environment affects motivation. Organismic psychological needs therefore are satisfied through the constant exchange between a person and their environment. These specific needs of self-determination, competence, and relatedness affect interest in and enjoyment of activities by fulfilling or not fulfilling the broader psychological needs for involvement and satisfaction.

Inherent to organismic theories is the belief that people have an intrinsic motivation to affect changes in their environment at the same time that the environment has the capacity to cause people to adjust to its demands (Reeve, 1997, 77). People are therefore inherently active and prompted to this activity within their environment by the desire to fulfill the needs ..."

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