Evidence of Dentistry in Pre-Columbian Mexico Essay by MJ

Evidence of Dentistry in Pre-Columbian Mexico
A look at evidence of early dentistry methods in Pre-Columbian Mexico, which suggests that native Mesoamericans were part of a very civilized culture.
# 1098 | 2,500 words | 6 sources | 1999 | US


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From the Paper:

" There is existing evidence that dentistry was practiced in Mexico before and after the Conquest. This can be seen by studying the dental mutilations, consisting of skillfully executed filing and inlaying with a variety of different materials. This is confirmed by X-rays, taken of excavated skulls. These skulls are part of the Mexican collection of mutilated teeth, which is the largest in the world. There are also numerous documents that verify the use of medicinal plants in the practice of dentistry. The sophistication of this pharmacology and the intricate work found in the inlays and filings lends qualification to the theory that these native Mesoamericans were part of a very civilized culture. "

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APA Format

Evidence of Dentistry in Pre-Columbian Mexico (2001, April 23) Retrieved May 26, 2020, from https://www.academon.com/essay/evidence-of-dentistry-in-pre-columbian-mexico-1098/

MLA Format

"Evidence of Dentistry in Pre-Columbian Mexico" 23 April 2001. Web. 26 May. 2020. <https://www.academon.com/essay/evidence-of-dentistry-in-pre-columbian-mexico-1098/>

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