African-American Resistance to Race and Gender Roles Essay by jackinbox

African-American Resistance to Race and Gender Roles
A look at the extent to which African-Americans were able to resist stereotypes of race and gender roles, between 1865 and 1896.
# 59204 | 1,895 words | 12 sources | MLA | 2005 | GB


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Description:

This paper examines how African-Americans struggled to resist stereotypes of race and gender in the face of hostile and aggressive racism and how white southerners had for generations 'owned' their African-American counterparts making the struggle for equality and respect a long and difficult process. It discusses how, although it is important not to underestimate the achievements of African-American women, especially, the vitriolic hostility and fervent racism meant certain white constructed race and gender roles, still live on in the south.

From the Paper:

"The oppressive nature of slavery had had dramatic effects on African American gender roles. As the slaves were property of the plantation master, there was no need for males to act as the family head or providers. Stanley Elkins argues the severity of the slave regime crippled the slave personality, which therefore made slaves unable to partake in any actions that would resemble those of an organized community. Elkins believed that the severe mental trauma resulted in a defensive response, manifested in a loss of individuality, and instead created one uniform psychologically handicapped personality, which he termed 'Sambo.' "

Cite this Essay:

APA Format

African-American Resistance to Race and Gender Roles (2005, June 07) Retrieved August 21, 2019, from https://www.academon.com/essay/african-american-resistance-to-race-and-gender-roles-59204/

MLA Format

"African-American Resistance to Race and Gender Roles" 07 June 2005. Web. 21 August. 2019. <https://www.academon.com/essay/african-american-resistance-to-race-and-gender-roles-59204/>

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